11 comments on “Oooh, Oooh, I Know This One!

  1. “Becasue we’re culturally closer to America than we are to the Continent?”

    In coffee, we’re not. Maybe we used to be, but we’re not now. When I order a coffee in the UK I don’t get a full mug of coffee where I can still see the bottom of the mug. When I’m in America I have to order a mug of “espresso”.

  2. “Gee, Kay Tie, when was the last time you visited, 1975? Talk about outdated stereotypes.”

    Hmmn. East Coast, West Coast, shit kicking states, and the square ones down by Mexico. Within last 5 years. All post-1975.

    I expect coffee was better in 1975.

  3. I think you have to try real hard to find anything as bad as you describe, Kay Tie. Even the ubiquitous Denny’s and MacDonalds have been serving coffee that doesn’t match your description for at least 5 years. True, it may not taste that great, but it isn’t so clear as to see to the bottom of the mug.

  4. I expect coffee was better in 1975. You’d be wrong. Anyone with half a brain knows that. But it is obvious that you haven’t got a clue what you are talking about so I should stop interfering with your fairy tale. In our next chapter, Kay Tie will share how the advent of Starbucks destroyed the great American coffee house, once found on street corners everywhere and serving only the finest in Italian roasted coffee.

  5. Kay Tie: I do apologize about my flip responses – “bad hair day” on my end. Still, I’m at a loss as to where you are encountering swill as described on a regular basis. Starbucks and its imitators are everywhere (and you aren’t seeing through the coffee to the bottom of the mug at any of those I know of), most restaurants and even quite a few fast-food places have gone “up-scale” in their offerings (at least to the point of resembling a dark roast). While I’ve run into a few places still serving the old Maxwell House standard fare, those are increasingly rare. I drive a few thousand miles of back roads all over the west annually (in a 1929 Ford Model A no less) and end up eating in some pretty remote locations. Even in those places, the average cup of coffee is far better than it was in 1975. In fact, a surprising number actually have an espresso machine – and not one of those automatics.

  6. We have many traditions in common with other English-speaking countries, it’s true.

    But culturally closer to America than the rest of Europe? I don’t think so. Our common language fools us into thinking we are culturally similar Americans (and them us) but, in reality we are very different. We tend to have a much more European outlook.

  7. You can get a good cup of cofee in the US, even at Starbucks. You just have to know which blends and stores. Starbucks’ regular blend is mediocre, but some of their others are decent. I live in New York and in Manhattan you are never more than a 30 second walk from a Starbucks, and in the other boroughs, never more than a few minutes drive and I have had quite a few Starbucks cofees from a variety of blends. Still, I prefer to make my own mostly because it is cheaper (at least cheaper than Starbucks), and because I get to brew my cofee exactly how I like it.

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