Readers Elsewhere

So, is this Our Kendrick then?

Dear Economist,
A single Milky Way costs 20p in my local corner shop. A twin pack costs 47p. I’ve made a habit of checking the prices in other shops and a twin pack invariably costs more than two singles. What could be the cause of this apparent madness?
The madness in pricing, that is, not the madness of a twenty-something compulsively checking the price of children’s sweets.
Kendrick Curtis, via e-mail

8 comments on “Readers Elsewhere

  1. Perhaps our savvy corner shop owner might suspect them to be giffen, or even Veblen, goods?

  2. The two pack is a luxury and you always pay more for a luxury.
    And no child wants a single pack.

  3. Will Rhodes: I agree about North American chocolate- why do Hershey Bars have a grainy texture?
    Could the 52p price for two be a cunning plan by Dawn Primarolo our Public Health Minister to dissuade binge choccing?

  4. I’ve seen similar wacky pricing in my local supermarket, but in the opposite direction. A single bottle of Stella Artois costs around ₡800, or about 80p, whereas a six-pack in a cardboard carton costs around ₡3600, or £3.60. Needless to say I do not buy Stella in less than multiples of six.

  5. I noticed the other day in Tescos, the french ground coffee I buy is 70p for a small pack, but the large pack (twice the size) which I’d previously assumed was cheaper is in fact over £3!

    I think it’s a con – they guess, correctly, that a lot of people cannot or will not check the prices and actually calculate the per/g cost of the item, and those people will /assume/ the bigger pack is better value and so the shop can sell them less for more money.

    Bastards.

    As time goes on and school standards drop more, I expect to see more and more of this. Lucky I’m old enough to have actually been taught to do mental arithmetic!! 🙂

    Zorro.

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