Doesn\’t Change Much

But a previous plan, stating that by 2010 anyone applying for a new passport would be given an ID card as well, has changed. Now passport applicants will be given a choice.

Ministers will then wait to see how this voluntary scheme progresses before any expansion.

Personal details from both passports and ID cards will still be entered on the National Identity Register, Miss Smith will say. New biometric passports contain fingerprints and iris scans.

It\’s that National Database which is, as it always has been, the problem.

And by next year certain workers in "key sensitive areas" like airports and ports will have to carry the new document. That will be part of long-term anti-terrorist measures.

Internal passports, here we come.

12 thoughts on “Doesn\’t Change Much”

  1. And on R4 this morning, she said that the Database will be secure against hacking because it won’t be online. That’ll be until someone at the Sun gets a job in some department and extracts their own data, then, to “show how easy it is”. And it won’t hold biometrics. That’ll be held on another database “only accessible by people with extra-high soooper-doooper O.M.G. security clearances”. And it won’t hold medical data, police data or anything else because they’ll be on separate databases too.

    The issue of not knowing how many non-EU nationals wander about the UK was glossed over in the languid sweep of a hand, of course, but naturally, they’ll all – especially the terrorist sleepers – flock down to the local nick, or wherever, to apply and have their DNA taken.

    Makes you wonder what all the fuss is about.

  2. “And on R4 this morning, she said that the Database will be secure against hacking because it won’t be online.”

    Oh yes it will. The whole project’s finances depend on selling access to it.

    “And it won’t hold medical data, police data or anything else because they’ll be on separate databases too.”

    It won’t need to be on one database: the Government is using the ID card as the key to linking records in all the databases together, so they form one large distributed superdatabase.

    “they’ll all – especially the terrorist sleepers – flock down to the local nick, or wherever, to apply and have their DNA taken.”

    They will be swept up when pinch-points are patrolled by the “papers please” police. As Tim says, “hello internal passports”.

  3. “we should see an identity card, like a passport, in country, if you like, that entitles people – we are not using it as an entitlement card, but it gives people easier access to certain services.” – Meg Hillier, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State, Home Office, in evidence to the Home Affairs Committee.

  4. I’ve just read through the CoP on the issuing of fines for non-compliance in getting the card.

    £125 for failing to make, or turn up to, the appointment for being scanned, with an appeals process to the Secretary of State (hah!), or the County Court. Fines then re-applied for failure to re-make an appointment, and so on ad infinitum.

    Fine for failing to tell the Secretary of State that you lost the card: £125.

    Protections for “vulnerable” people, natch, but requiring medical evidence of disability.

    My bad back, it’s terrible, plays up randomly, ooo, had to call the GP out the other day, gave me a sick note too. What a shame, I missed my enrolment appointment. I’ll have to be let off the fine.

    And if my back problems clear up, I still won’t have any fingerprints to take because the day before the appointment I was doing some DIY and sandpapering, and whaddyaknow, my fingerprints got sanded off.

    Shame I caused all that trouble. It would be really terrible if millions of Brits were like me, and the whole system collapsed.

  5. Alas, Kay Tie, most Brits will just do as they’re told and form orderly queues at the interview centre. That’s what’s meant by ‘being British’.

  6. “Alas, Kay Tie, most Brits will just do as they’re told and form orderly queues at the interview centre. That’s what’s meant by ‘being British’.”

    We didn’t go quietly into the night for the Poll Tax, did we?

  7. It won’t need to be on one database: the Government is using the ID card as the key to linking records in all the databases together, so they form one large distributed superdatabase.

    I know. That’s why the whole interview was a pack of lies from the Home Secretary, again. The contempt in which we’re held by the politicians of all persuasions in the regional government office in Westminster is startling.

    Shame I caused all that trouble. It would be really terrible if millions of Brits were like me, and the whole system collapsed.

    Yes….. and the major-league, fun possibilities for messing up samples of cells taken for DNA records from the basal mucosa by ensuring there’s cross contamination with someone else’s DNA haven’t even been begun to be explored yet, as far as I can see……………. 😀

  8. Anyone fancy applying for more than one card?

    There’s an opportunity at the start of the scheme and we could cross approve each others “identity”.

  9. “Anyone fancy applying for more than one card?”

    Blunkett made a big thing of this being impossible due to the matching with an identity already there. This was down to the strength of iris scans, but they’ve been dropped.

    Possibly, just possibly, false all-ten-finger matches would be infrequent enough to allow a thorough follow-up investigation of the two identities to see if they were the same person.

    Getting both to appear in the same room at the same time ought to ensure that Spiderman and Peter Parker don’t both get cards..

  10. “I think you have too much confidence in the abilities of government”

    I did say “just possibly”. As in “theoretically”. As in “never in a million years under New Labour”

  11. Having a good snog with ones loved one minutes before the DNA swab is taken should mess the sample up enough to make it unusable. A good tongueing by your beloved should leave enough epithelial cells in your mouth for that. Fun too.

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