Erm….

A powerful coalition of children’s charities is urging ministers to make it illegal for companies to trawl Facebook and other social networking websites for information on prospective recruits.

How?

14 thoughts on “Erm….”

  1. How? By getting Labour MPs to vote for a law and getting the Queen to sign the bit of paper.

    I think you meant “how will it be enforced?” Ah, well, that’s not an issue for the legislature these days. You see, laws are now passed to “send a message.”

  2. “Deborah Fernon, resourcing adviser at the CIPD, said….we would warn companies that in the quest to find the right person for a job, social networking sites could be at best irrelevant and at worst misleading. “

    Really…? I’d have thought they gave you a very revealing picture of the prospective candidate…

  3. Presumably this motion is seconded by Facebook. After all, once someone has been turned down for a job based on their online profile, the whole social networking thing would tend to lose its shine.

  4. “After all, once someone has been turned down for a job based on their online profile, the whole social networking thing would tend to lose its shine.”

    Never underestimate the stupidity of Facebook’s audience or user base…

  5. “John Carr, secretary of the Children’s Charities’ Coalition on Internet Safety, who is coordinating the campaign, said that pictures or gossip up-loaded during the teenage years should not be used against a young person ten years later.”

    If someone’s judging you on that, you probably don’t want to work for them.

  6. Presumably this motion is seconded by Facebook

    Facebook should care. There’s a limitless supply of morons, as long as the human race keeps breeding. They’re called teenagers and they know it all; their generation is the first, no one else understands, there was nothing new in the world before they came along.

    You must surely remember; I was one once, and I’m pretty sure you and JuliaM were, too. We were just, perhaps, lucky that our world was somewhat smaller and thereby a little more forgiving of childish error.

    I can’t tell you how glad I am that at certain (often very enjoyable 😀 ) episodes in my life, there were no mobile phones equipped with cameras and voice recorders in the hands of, er, “friends”, and no such thing as an “upload”. Well, not an online one, anyway.

  7. Have heart, people. John Carr is the husband of Labour Peer and as such can’t have a normal job. As a government plant, his job is to whip up enough hysteria about the web that we eventually are forced to censor it. I don’t very much like the cut of the man’s jib!

  8. Ex-cuse-me!

    I am a member of Facebook – OK, I am an imbecile, naive, moronic and plain dumb – but it is a place of fun if you want it to be.

    If a prospective employer said they had seen me on Facebook and asked what I really thought about such and such I would tell them to feck off and walk out of the interview and probably put it up that they snooped on there.

    In fact, you give me an idea for a group!

  9. If a prospective employer said they had seen me on Facebook and asked what I really thought about such and such I would tell them to feck off

    Thank you for coming in today, Will; we needn’t detain you. Next! 😀

  10. I’m waiting for the first reverse-Facebook lawsuit – where an employer is sued for NOT finding out some unsavoury thing about their newest hire by scanning his/her Facebook presence. It is, after all, in the public domain, creating an argument that the employer had a duty to seek out aspects of the employee’s life which it could reasonably foresee would have led to (enter problem here).

    To the larger point, I find the idea of participation in an enterprise like Facebook to be an incredibly witless idea fior the average individual. Why in the world would it be of the slightest value to your life to share it with untold-millions of total strangers? All I can see is downsides, and the idea of prospective employers – or anyone else with whom one has casual or incidental contact – being able to find out things you might not be ready to share with them is just another one. It’s not the idea of the employer that would worry me – the worst an employer can do is not hire you. It’s the sociopath that would worry me far more.

    llater,

    llamas

  11. In order for somebody, or some company, to see anything more than your profile picture on Facebook, you must first allow them access by first authorising them to “be your friend”. Presumably, the candidate isn’t daft enough to accept a friend invitation from Ernst & Young three days after his interview?

    Or has this function been hacked already?

  12. ” the Children’s Charities’ Coalition”: that reminds me why I stopped donating to a Children’s Charity – the buggers have decided that politicking is more fun and less work than doing good is.

  13. “In order for somebody, or some company, to see anything more than your profile picture on Facebook, you must first allow them access by first authorising them to “be your friend”.”

    They can find you in certain groups if they really look. It is hard to do, but possible.

  14. “markc // Mar 25, 2008 at 6:30 pm

    If a prospective employer said they had seen me on Facebook and asked what I really thought about such and such I would tell them to feck off

    Thank you for coming in today, Will; we needn’t detain you. Next! :-D”

    *Shrugs shoulders* Time for a pint. 😀

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