Press Freedom

Magazines could be banned from using airbrushed photographs of celebrities that make them look slimmer over fears that they are promoting unrealistic body images.

At the moment it\’s actually a voluntary code of conduct that\’s under discussion. And no, of course I don\’t give two hoots about whether models are airbrushed or not.

But we do know that we have a government fond of the statement "if the voluntary option has failed we should look to legislation"….

The move follows criticisms by the Model Health Inquiry, which accused editors of acting irresponsibly and promoting a size-zero culture.

The report, released last September, urged the fashion industry to adopt a voluntary code on the use of computer technology to give models unrealistically perfect figures.

If the prodnoses can force, under the threat of such legislation, that restriction upon the freedom of the press (however trivial it is in these first stages) then what next? How long before a news picture of someone smoking must carry a health warning? Or people must look miserable in a pub? Or we must "respect" all religions?

11 thoughts on “Press Freedom”

  1. How about just a simple label on the cover:

    ‘Warning – contains images that have been altered for your greater viewing pleasure and persons depicted may have been surgically enhanced. These may be disturbing or dangerous to your mental health’

  2. What about pictures of women like Maria Sharapova who looks incredibly good and slim without airbrushing? Are they going to fatten her up a bit on photoshop?

  3. I dunno, I kind of think that the press should have some kind of requirement to report what they see rather than what they’d like to see. I don’t think that splattering pictures of extremely thin women everywhere helps women with the body issues that they are almost certain to have to face due to today’s airbrushed, pixel-perfect print media.

  4. “Magazines could be banned from using airbrushed photographs of celebrities that make them look slimmer over fears that they are promoting unrealistic body images.”

    I’m confused, I thought we were all meant to be cowering from the Great Obesity Crisis, yet now suddenly we are supposed to be fearing the Great Size Zero image.

    Which is currently winning again…?

  5. “I don’t think that splattering pictures of extremely thin women everywhere helps women with the body issues that they are almost certain to have to face due to today’s airbrushed, pixel-perfect print media”

    No woman *has* to face body issues unless she chooses to stop thinking. Women who take Vogue seriously won’t be helped by censoring photographers, they simply need to learn to distinguish between fantasy and reality.

    Very few men demand thinness or physical perfection as a prerequisite for a decent relationship – this about women competing with each other and supporting a world-wide weight-loss industry that rakes in more than the GNP of some small countries.

    They’re the same idiots who pay vast sums for the privilege of offering their derrieres as advertising space for designers, buy handbags for £1,500 that cost the manufacturer a tenner to produce, and think they’re getting value for money when buying a 1.5 oz pot of face cream for £150 that’s made of ingredients that come in industrial-sized drums costing £50.

    Maybe the fashion industry really is the only exception to the saying that one can’t fool all of the people all of the time.

  6. “I don’t think that splattering pictures of extremely thin women everywhere helps women with the body issues that they are almost certain to have to face due to today’s airbrushed, pixel-perfect print media.”

    Sorry but that’s nonsense. Women have always aspired to the prevailing fashion, long before stick-thin models appeared in the magazines. The pressure isn’t external, it is coming from the woman in the mirror.

    And the magazines are not there to help women with body issues, they are there to make money. They do that by publishing the things women want to read about.

    Most women, and most men, are actually mature enough to accept their imperfect selves, and get on with enjoying life. But there is a small minority of self-obsessed crybabies who can’t find the integrity to do that. They shouldn’t be allowed to curb the freedoms of anyone else.

  7. Errrr, doesn’t all this nonsense overlook the fact that, even ignoring the weight issue, these women are much more attractive/stylish/striking than the typical woman and so represent an unachievable image anyway. Whilst the average person might aspire towards their look, to think you could completely achieve it is a fallacy that no amount of airbrush-banning will protect you from.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *