One really is lost in admiration at how the combination of our central and provincial governments can take a problem and make it so comprehensively worse.

This time it\’s over scrapping cars.

Time was that a scrap car had a value to the last owner. The value of the scrap metal in it. There was thus an incentive to take it to someone who would pay that scrap metal value and thus few if any cars were simply dumped on the streets.

Now, in the name of environmental protection, the car has a negative value: the cost of disposal is higher than hte scrap metal value. So, clearly, the incentive is to dump the car, not take it to someone who will charge you that negative value.

 

Some 300,000 cars are abandoned every year, costing local authorities £26m to remove them and trace their owners.

The government says the problem has increased sharply in the past five years and is projected to keep rising.

An amazing finding, eh? Incentives matter.

 

8 thoughts on “Quite So”

  1. £26m divided by 300,000 = £87.

    So add £87 ‘disposal tax’ to the cost of a new car (for every car scrapped a new one is bought), job done, what’s the problem? If the council can pick up the car and get a few £ for the scrap, then so much the better.

  2. This, and they cannot see what will happen when they start charging us by the Kg for waste disposal? Does the monocular cunt really want Britains countryside turned into one massive fucking fly-tip? Because that’s what is going to fucking happen…

  3. According to the BBC article to which the Eurobores link, the rise in dumping cars “is due to
    a combination of factors, including the rise in car ownership and a drop in the value of scrap metal”.

    Are you saying these were not factors?

    Tim adds: Yes, given that the value of scrap metal has doubled since that article was written.

  4. Tim adds: Yes, given that the value of scrap metal has doubled since that article was written.

    So you are talking about dumping when, exactly?

    Tim adds: Cars are still being dumped, so today. Yes, the scrap value has gone up, but so has the cost of the regulations: thus the incentives are as I say.

    With new steel at $1,000 a tonne, copper over $4 a pound, it really is quite something for regulation to make a half tonne car worth less than nothing. But they’ve managed it.

  5. Tim adds: Cars are still being dumped, so today. Yes, the scrap value has gone up, but so has the cost of the regulations: thus the incentives are as I say.

    So where are the statistics for cars being dumped today? Why does the Eurobore blog, and the piece you quote from it, link to an irrelevant article?

  6. Go find the figures yourself, StuartA, and stop asking silly questions.

    There was me thinking that Tim Worstall’s “finding” was based on relevant figures. How stupid of me. Instead, of course, he links to irrelevant figures and supplies a pre-fab conclusion. I understand know.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *