Forward to the XIV th Century!

With Caroline Lucas MEP:

She concluded: “A re-localisation of our food systems would allow us take back control of our food from industrialists and financiers, and to feed a growing population in a way that is equitable and sustainable, while safeguarding human health, as well as the welfare of animals and the environment.

Let\’s only eat local, in season food!

December is Turnip Month in England! January we have Swedes! For a change, in February, it\’s Turnip Month again! March? Have you ever had anything as tasty as a spring green?

NB: strawberries are scehduled for the last week of June and the first two weeks of July. As long as it doesn\’t rain that year in those weeks.

 

15 thoughts on “Forward to the XIV th Century!”

  1. Why doesn’t she lead by example then? I’m sure she can buy turnips and asparagus in season where she lives. Let her do it for a year then come back and tell us what she thinks.

    Presumably she’ll also be spurning 20th century medicine too, because “financiers and industrialists” are the backbone of the evil big pharma. With a bit of luck she’ll be dead from consumption before the turnip experiment ends.

  2. You think it would be bad in England, think of the poor people in the north of Scotland; salted fish an potatoes *every* day. Unless you’d had blight that year in which case it would be salted fish, unless your boat sank in which case you’d be dead.

  3. So Much For Subtlety

    Salted fish and potatoes? Luxury!

    I am sure that a principled Scottish person would reject the entire neo-colonialist Globalisation project that brought Scotland the American Spud and besides, they would also refuse to eat it anyway out of respects for the First Peoples of the Americas, their deep spiritual ties to their lands and in recognition of the genocide that they faced post-Colombus.

    So salted fish and porrige it is. Every day.

  4. “… would allow us take back control of our food from industrialists and financiers”

    When she says “us” she means politicians, which is always worrying.

    When she says “industrialists and financiers”, she is presumably referring to the beneficiaries and administrators of the CAP. Or have I missed something?

  5. I live in a small town where the locals seem to only eat local in season veg. Thank God for Carrefour, just 20 minutes away.

  6. Those principled Scots are then also out of corn and corn products, tomatoes, green and lima beans, strawberries(?), most fruits, etc. I’m not familiar with agriculture in the UK-what fruits can be grown there? I guess with the return of the Medivial Warming, grapes will return, so maybe some other things as well.
    How does a huge change in land use to gardening protect the animals and environment?

  7. For a South East Region MEP, La Lucas doesn’t seem keen on immigrants either. Shouldn’t think Somalis & Nigerians are up to speed on several exciting things to do with parsnips & can’t see the Lee Valley being suitable for rice paddies so the Indians & Chinese aren’t going to be pleased. Come to think of it pigs & dairy produce are an essential facet of Northern European agriculture. The muslims won’t like the sausages & the orientals simply can’t eat the cheese. Their bodies don’t produce the enzyme to digest lactose. Neither do would they enjoy the beer that would become an important food item for similar reasons. She hasn’t got much sympathy for vegetarians either, apparently. Animal products are non-optional for the regional agriculture. The diet wouldn’t provide the needed protein without them.
    Can’t say I agree with Tim on the 14thC label though. If you’re going to forego trade in foodstuffs you’re going to be losing spices as well. So say goodbye to pepper on those turnips & hello to the 6thC .

  8. > Those principled Scots are then also out of corn and corn products, tomatoes, green and lima beans, strawberries(?), most fruits, etc. I’m not familiar with agriculture in the UK-what fruits can be grown there?

    You will be surprised to hear that Scotland is actually one of the best places in the world for growing raspberries, blackberries, tayberries (the clue’s in the name), strawberries, etc. Lots of sun and lots of rain.

  9. Squander:

    Doesn’t surprise me at all. Here in the US, we’ve got lots of wild berries and I’ve enjoyed gathering the types prevalent in the NE: strawberries, raspberries, black raspberries, and blackberries. Never cared much for blueberries or the wild type (huckleberries) and only like cranberry sauce, not the berries themselves.
    The biggest blackberries are on the Pacific coast, though–so big that the weight of the berries actually weighs the canes down to the ground and the berries are as big as the last joint of your thumb. In the Smokey Mtns. (NC/TN), there are high mountain meadows many acres in size–literally carpeted with strawberries. Some of the very best (and biggest) “wild” strawberries are to be found around long-abandoned settlements, where once-cultivated gardens have reverted to a wild state. Forty years ago, northern (near coastal) California was dotted with farms abandoned during the Great Depression and which had not only wild (reverted) berries of all types, but apples, cherries, apricots, pears, peaches, plums, and grapes–all growing wild on the same piece of land.

    In the South, my favorite “berry” is the pecan.

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