Glorious Discrimination!

Oh yes, quite wonderful!

Sue Cotton, head of adoption services at the NCH children\’s charity, said that allowing a white family to adopt an ethnic minority child was not practical. “When we talk to couples we explain they have to meet all the child\’s needs, and ethnicity is one of their needs. They would struggle to meet that, no matter how well-meaning and understanding they are.”

So what happens to such ethnic minority children? No doubt they are all placed with families of the appropriate background?

Ethnic minority children are over-represented in the care system. Just under 80 per cent of those in the system are white compared with 87 per cent of the overall population. The Government has commissioned a report into the issue. BAAF said that ethnic minority children almost always stay in care longer than white children, and a greater proportion were not adopted at all.

Ah, no, some are not adopted at all. They grow up in the council care system, that greatest and most reliable single predictor of a life of failure.

Isn\’t that wonderful? Much, much better that a life should be entirely trashed than it should be lived without adequate deference to ethnicity, don\’t you think?

9 thoughts on “Glorious Discrimination!”

  1. A child’s needs for love, respect, security, food, shelter, play, education…these I understand; but what in Hades does the need ‘ethnicity’ consist of?

  2. I have actually heard an adoption organiser talk about “octoroons” and how they are different to white kids and need their “Ethnicity” to be catered for in their upbringing. Such a well meaning politically correct creature was shocked and surprised when I thought it sounded like the racist thoughts of the deep south that I thought had not been voiced for many a year…

  3. The figures are more helpful if phrased the intelligent way round – Just over 20 per cent of those in the system are non-white compared with 13 per cent of the overall population.

  4. To be fair, I know a mixed-race couple who have been trying to adopt for over a year, and they specified (quite sensibly, if you ask me) that they be given a mixed-race child, so that they look like a family when they are out and about (rather than people spotting straight away that one child is the odd one out).

  5. I read a few years ago about a black couple who were not allowed to adopt because they had not experienced racism.
    Why is state racism acceptable when individual racism not?

  6. I think that, all other things being equal, having the same ethnic background should tip the balance as it would be helpful if a parent could bring their own experience to bear if the child suffers racist abuse. I realize that this argument could apply to all sorts of attributes that a parent may or may not have in common with their child, but. sadly, I think race related problems are quite likely to crop up.

    However, this is not the same as saying that it should completely rule out adoptive parents of a different ethnic background.

  7. I think that, all other things being equal, having the same ethnic background should tip the balance as it would be helpful if a parent could bring their own experience to bear if the child suffers racist abuse.

    Not so sure about that. My kid brother and sister are mixed race (their mother is Nigerian), and I’m not sure that my (our) Dad really needs to have experienced racism to deal with any problem they might have in this regard.

  8. Mark Wadsworth, as someone who has considered adoption i can assure I I wouldn’t care if a child looked different. Or are you implying that children who look different can’t “look like [part of] a family”? I don’t quite understand. What happens to albinos? Do they get adopted out to Albino-land for their own good?

  9. Pingback: British Apartheid - Charles Crawford

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