The details of \”Balanced Migration\”

Frank Field lays them out.

Employers would have to advertise jobs, first locally and then throughout the EU – as they should now, but some plainly do not. For its part, the government would wish to ensure applicants\’ qualifications were genuine. These workers would then be admitted, but only for a maximum of four years. They would come to the UK on that clear understanding. Employers would have to produce evidence that workers had left at the end of their contracts. No departure, no approval for new contracts.

This is very, very different from what everyone else seems to be reporting. One in one out depends not upon the number of Brits coming in or out, nor the number of any others groups, EU nationals, family members or asylum seekers.

It\’s purely that the number of economic migrants will be capped and for one to come in one must leave.

I still need to see the report itself to see what the relative numbers are but I really don\’t see howmuch this might help anything. I\’m still working on the assumption that non-EU economic migrants are the smallest part of immigration as a whole. It\’s also true that economic migrants are the people that we arguably want more than any of the other groups….

5 thoughts on “The details of \”Balanced Migration\””

  1. Only for a maximum of four years? I’ve no doubt that this will be applied efficiently and fairly. Of course, it won’t apply to those in special categories, such as foreign journalists, premiership footballers, business leaders, university professors, doctors, nurses, foreign nationals serving in the armed forces, …

  2. My understanding is that the one-in, one-out rule applies to the availability of citizenship, not the ability to come work here.

  3. Employers would have to advertise jobs, first locally and then throughout the EU – as they should now, but some plainly do not. For its part, the government would wish to ensure applicants’ qualifications were genuine. These workers would then be admitted, but only for a maximum of four years. They would come to the UK on that clear understanding. Employers would have to produce evidence that workers had left at the end of their contracts. No departure, no approval for new contracts.

    You mean adopt the work permit system that Russia currently employs? Brilliant. No problems associated with that then, no people left sitting about without visas whilst some government department studies their qualifications, no massive increase in the cost of employing a foreigner, oh no!

  4. “I’m still working on the assumption that non-EU economic migrants are the smallest part of immigration as a whole. ”

    Timmy, whatever gave you that idea?

    Get real.

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