The commoditisation of human life

Scary scary cloning:

It\’s easy to say that this represents the commoditisation of human life. That\’s true. But there\’s something both more sinister and more simple that\’s emerging. We\’re so accustomed to being consumers in every other area of our lives that we\’re becoming consumers of human life itself, looking for ways in which we can buy a person-shell off the shelf.

Well, yes, but we\’ve already sold that pass well and truly. When viable human beings are killed because their mother\’s simply don\’t want them, when those with genetic differences can be (and are) aborted in the 7 th month of pregnancy, I rather think we\’ve already got that commoditisation of human life, haven\’t we?

This isn\’t another one of my digs at whether abortion is right or wrong, rather, a simple observation about commodification. Once you\’ve said that not every life is unique, equally worthy of protection, then we have indeed decided that it is a commodity.

5 thoughts on “The commoditisation of human life”

  1. Don’t really get the fear of cloning (apart from the technical problems leading to genetic damage). The cloned person is just as valid a human as the original person, but they will never be the same person: we are much more than our DNA.

    Besides, if there is such horror and revulsion at identical people walking the earth then why do we permit identical twins?

  2. Kay, cloning becomes a bit of a problem if we use DNA to identify people for security checks or to investigate crimes, but apart from that I’m not too worried. I’ve no doubt that a human clone will be created – someone will do it just to be the one to have done it. However, replicas are a stupid idea. Expensive to make and, as you said, never the same individual as the original. Besides, if we want more humans what is wrong with the old fashioned production method?

    The cloning we do want is cloning of spare parts for transplant.

  3. “Once you’ve said that not every life is unique, equally worthy of protection, then we have indeed decided that it is a commodity.”

    The argument in favour of allowing women to abort a foetus is not an argument that “not every life …equally worthy of protection”, it is an argument about the definition of life. Pro-lifers’ argument is that a foetus is not properly human, and therefore that the right to life does not apply to it. One may agree or disagree with this argument, but it does not represent the “commoditisation of human life”.

  4. “loning becomes a bit of a problem if we use DNA to identify people for security checks or to investigate crimes”

    Worse than identical twins? I suppose in a Star Wars scenario where there are thousands of identical DNA people running about, then yes, I suppose we’d all have to have barcode tattoos on the forearm instead.

  5. “when those with genetic differences can be (and are) aborted in the 7 th month of pregnancy….”: it wasn’t all that long ago that quite a few were aborted in the 10th month.

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