How to get better teachers

Umm, well, you know?

But that drives out the able teachers and demoralises those who remain: 30-50 % leave the profession in the first five years or throughout the career an average of 12 percent abandon teaching.

I don\’t think we\’ll be taking advice on academia from one capable of committing to paper quite such a mangled sentence, eh?

If 30-50% abandon it all within the first five years then the total career average drop out rate is going to be a great deal higher than 12%, isn\’t it?

5 thoughts on “How to get better teachers”

  1. The country has half a million teachers. I’m sure there are some bad ones that are worth getting rid of, but if education is to improve widely, the education systems have to make better use of existing teachers. Half a million better teachers are not going to appear from anywhere.

  2. And you aren’t going to get half a million graduates to spend three years getting a good degree, one more year getting a PGCE, and then all heading into the state education system we have now.

    Our schools have become places where a bunch of glorified childminders keep the pupils off the streets until the chip shops open at teatime. No wonder there are so many poorly qualified teachers. Especially in our junior schools.

    Tim adds: Actually, we’ve plenty of people with hte correct pieces of paper. It’s just that they’re in hte LEAs, not teaching but shuffling paper. Abolish the LEAs and we’ve plenty of teachers.

  3. “Tim adds: Actually, we’ve plenty of people with hte correct pieces of paper. It’s just that they’re in hte LEAs, not teaching but shuffling paper.”

    But why are they there? Is it because they aren’t good teachers? Or because the pay is better?

  4. They are mainly people who started out as teachers, and escaped into the LEA as quickly as they could. I always got the impression that getting away from the schools and the kids was enough of an inducement.

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