Jessica Read

In short, she\’s decided that since she doesn\’t like shopping on Sundays then you shouldn\’t be able to either.

How liberal.

Her final line is a glory though. After whining bitterly about how capitalism insists upon creating desires which it can then satisfy, moaning about how it is nothing but production so as to facilitate unnecessary consumption she says:

In the meantime, have fun with your 24/7 home decoration centres – I\’m off to bake an apple pie instead.

That is, she\’s going to produce so as to unnecessarily consume: no one actually needs an apple pie, after all.

11 thoughts on “Jessica Read”

  1. What this person does not seem, or care, to understand is that Sundays are often one of the few days that folk can buy certain things they need. In any event, for many people, their “day of rest” involves the fun of browsing through a shop; and for people who would otherwise not have work, earning some money on a Sunday is a benefit.

    But as Tim says, it all comes down to whether you believe in freedom, or you don’t.

  2. This highlights once again that the primary characteristic of The Enemy is a moral crusade (rather than e.g. communists and their class strugglishness). It’s one reason they can’t be beaten through economics based arguments; their economic views are those which suit their moral purpose- which is quasi-religous, romantic and ruralist. Two of the most significant precursors of the modern “anglo” left are the religious revival of the late C18/C19 and Romanticism (both of which can trace directly to pietism). The religious aspect provided a direct disapproval of pleasure, luxury and comfort (they distract ye from thy God) while the Romantics provided the deification of the peasant life, the imaginary idyllic past, the preference for country over town, rejection of industrialism and its consequent mass production, the “honest” country life vs. the “decadent” urban.

    Add into that a simple class consciousness- the nobs don’t like us scrotes having what they have, eating similar foods, travelling etc- and you pretty much have the anglosphere left in all its repulsive glory.

    After the failure of the “other two” socialisms- fascism and communism- what was left were the anglosocialists; nasty, mean spirited, snobbish, puritanical prune-faced prudes, who were thus left with a clear field to dominate the global cultural hegemony (© A. Gramsci) and that is what they have done. And they write Guardian articles about it in their spare time.

  3. “Add into that a simple class consciousness- the nobs don’t like us scrotes having what they have, eating similar foods, travelling etc- and you pretty much have the anglosphere left in all its repulsive glory.”

    Hence the rise of ‘green’ issues. Particularly air taxes…

  4. This highlights once again that the primary characteristic of The Enemy is a moral crusade

    Yes, I’d agree with that. It doesn’t map too neatly onto a left/right split, either: leaving aside the sterile debate over whether fascist parties are far-left or far-right, much of Ian’s analysis applies to Tory grassroots (stereotypically: Mary Whitehouse; Ann Widdicombe) as much as or more than Lab or Libs.

  5. If she’s baking an apple pie at this time of year, she’s using imported apples. The food miles!!!

  6. much of Ian’s analysis applies to Tory grassroots (stereotypically: Mary Whitehouse; Ann Widdicombe) as much as or more than Lab or Libs.

    Indeed it does. What I’m describing is the cultural hegemony of our society, effectively. The Left/Right axis is lacking in descriptive power and basically useless to us. It had some utility when the “Left” party had a strong communist/marxist (i.e. workers against the nobs) element, but those days are over and have been for a long time.

    That is- the “Left” have returned to their pre-marxist roots, as a ruling class who seek to save the masses from themselves, by depriving them of temptations and housing them in Port Sunlights (or eco-towns as we now call them). This model of the wise social philanthropist as shepherd of his peasants maps equally onto toryism; the “left” are however noticably more extreme and thorough though, having constructed over the past century a far more absolute moral code and list of sins (racism, sexism, pollution, using two sheets of toilet paper) than even Wesley would have dared dream of.

  7. I think it’s a glorious people’s revolutionary anti-capitalist apple pie so that makes it okay somehow .. :-/

    Anyway, I missed the bit in the article on how all these counter-revolutionary Sunday shoppers stop her from enjoying a peaceful day? I mean, no one is forcing her to go and shop.

  8. Note that while shops being open on a Sunday is considered bad, this doesn’t apply in her mind to the pâtisserie. Not only does she want to shop there on a Sunday, she shops just before closing time, probably hoping to get the éclairs cheap.

    Sunday opening is also OK for the local independent cinema, and what about the poor workers forced to work in the power stations and water treatment plants that enable her to bake her apple pie?

  9. “having constructed over the past century a far more absolute moral code and list of sins”

    It’s gone beyond sin: sin is between you and your god. They’ve made them into actual crimes. Just look at the use of the word “climate change denial” used in the same tone as “holocaust denial” (the latter already being made a crime). And if it’s not an actual crime, then the police will treat it as one in order to chill the rest of the population (drinking alcohol in public being a good example we discussed recently).

    The levers of power need to be out of the hands of people who would use them. In other words, they should be disconnected where possible.

  10. It’s gone beyond sin: sin is between you and your god. They’ve made them into actual crimes

    Hmm. You might want to read up on the history of, well, pretty much every religion apart from mainstream western Christianity and Judaism in the 20th and (so far) 21st century.

  11. Hence the emergence of secular societies. And if anyone doubts that’s progress, I refer you to Tim’s post on the execution of women..

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