No, don\’t like this at all

Yes, I know that the RSPCA has these powers:

A POLICE dog handler who allegedly left two German Shepherds to die in a car on one of the hottest days of the year is to be prosecuted by the RSPCA.

The Nottinghamshire officer, who has yet to be named, was suspended from duty after the animal charity decided he will be charged with causing unnecessary suffering to the dogs.

No, I\’m not happy that the RSPCA has these powers. Seriously now, which fuckwit decided that a private organisation should have the power to make criminal prosecutions?

19 thoughts on “No, don\’t like this at all”

  1. On the one hand, I’m happy to see them do it, because if it were left to the CPS, I could see it being quietly dropped.

    On the other hand, no, Tim’s point is well made. What next? Age Concern get the powers to prosecute for ‘ageism’?

  2. +1 on Alex’s comment – anyone can do the same thing, theroretically.

    I’d be more unhappy about the police officer involved being suspended for months on end on full pay at taxpayers’ expense, then possibly dismissed. Dismissed? What for? Is it necessary to fire someone who may well be perfectly competent in their job if they’re guilty of an offence at (let’s face it) the minor end of the scale?

    I can see it for some offences, sure. But not this sort.

  3. “It doesn’t – it brings a private prosecution.”

    The point is, it shouldn’t need to, nor should anyone else. Animal cruelty is a crime, and the CPS should be pursuing it.

    The RSPCA should only step in where the CPS has decided to drop it. Has that happened yet?

    “…if they’re guilty of an offence at (let’s face it) the minor end of the scale?”

    Take the point about the lengthy suspension process, but ‘at the minor end of the scale’? Really?

    I don’t think so….

  4. I never do. Even before I read that story, which should have seen a few RSPCA officials whacked on the head with a shovel.

    To put them out of everyone’s misery…

  5. ‘at the minor end of the scale’? Really? I don’t think so….

    I didn’t mean that allowing two dogs to die of heat exhaustion is a trivial act. Particularly since the copper in question is supposed to have care of his dogs as a core competence. I imagine it’s something he’ll carry with him for life in the unforgiving depths of conscience.

    But the act was likely one of omission or carelessness rather than an act of criminal intent. Should it be punished? Yes; but in the knowledge that someone in the position of the PC concerned will probably punish himself a whole lot more than the law can (given that a £20k fine and prison for a tragic first offence is unlikely). If he’d sold drugs from the evidence room, or weapons – fine, bin him. But for this? Nah.

  6. Tim – “which fuckwit decided that a private organisation should have the power to make criminal prosecutions” – I am surprised that you do not celebrate the right of private citizens to bring other citizens to trial if they feel the law has been broken. You wouldn’t want access to the courts to be for the government only .. would you?

  7. “I didn’t mean that allowing two dogs to die of heat exhaustion is a trivial act”

    …although it clearly is. What’s a police dog worth, £10k or so (a guide dog is £20k and they’re more highly trained AIUI)? So treat him about the same a policeman who totals a new Mondeo while driving without paying attention…

  8. A human life is costed somewhere around the million quid mark. So a fighter pilot who screws up and crashes a £30 million jet should get more time than Fred and Rosemary West.

  9. A human life is costed somewhere around the million quid mark.

    *You cannot price a good which is not in the marketplace.

    *No individual good has any value except at the instant of trading it.

  10. I’m also unhappy about this state of affairs.

    I know that commenters have mentioned the right to bring a private prosecution, and that is fine. But the article mentions a possible custodial sentence of six months if he is convicted in this case. I didn’t realise a private prosecution could deprive you of your liberty.

  11. Of all the comments here, Kay Tie is most to the point. I don’t have time right now to set out the book length case that can be made against the RSPCA. But I suspect that almost all of the folk who have been prosecuted by them have a strong class action cause to get compensation. I have put up two web sites regarding their sins – you’ll find them if you google “RSPCA UNMASKED PART ONE Verity Maxwell”, and “RSPCA UNMASKED PART TWO Glynne Sutcliffe”. Beware that they have tried to confuse people looking for these sites by putting up irrelevant garbage with the same search tags, so be precise. Remember that since these sites have been online, I have gathered much more information. Regarding the police dog handler, he is probably in grief. Also note that it is only come to public attention as an issue when it is a police officer in the RSPCA frame. Ordinary citizens attacked by them also need your attention, including, in Australia, Joe and Margaret Higham, George Karolyi, Ruth Downey and Geraldine Robertson. In the UK, contact Paul Shotton for another story.

  12. Have a google of “stanford prison experiment” to learn what happens to small groups given unsupervised police powers. Then google “rspca corruption” or “rspca poodles” or “ruth downey” to learn how rogue RSPCA have become because of their powers.

    RSPCA have bullid governmentsinto giving them an Act of parliament to administer with Police Powers. Supporting RSPCA is supporting Corruption of the worst sort. People are being bullied into handing over $100,000s to RSPCA. No society wants rogues exploiting their powers for money.

  13. A human life is costed somewhere around the million quid mark. So a fighter pilot who screws up and crashes a £30 million jet should get more time than Fred and Rosemary West.

    Does not follow: the fighter pilot would have to be *deliberately* crashing the jet for it to be comparable.

  14. Kay Tie: Oh, but you DO give money to the RSPCA, you know.

    Well perhaps “give” is not quite the word, but certainly they get quite a bit of moolah from you and me, whether we like it or not.

    They’re just an arm of the State, really, as shown by their behaviour as well as their funding.

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