Well, Art, I can see several things wrong with this

\”By the early 1800s, however, with the publication of David Ricardo\’s landmark work on free trade and the adoption of his ideas by Adam Smith, the British state had embraced global liberalism, and the British-dominated world economy that emerged after the Congress of Vienna of 1815 was defined almost entirely by these values.\”

Umm, Adam Smith died in 1790, Wealth of Nations was first published in 1776, Ricardo published his first work in economics in 1809, his major work on comparative advantage in 1817 (with the Congress of Vienna, as noted, in 1815), Britain didn\’t adopt free trade until the abolition of the Corn Laws in 1846 and, umm, we know that Ricardo didn\’t read Smith until 1799 while on holiday in Bath (and I really must find that house next time I go back home).

Anyone spot any other errors?

5 thoughts on “Well, Art, I can see several things wrong with this”

  1. Since most of macroeconomics is probably ordure, and no-one knows which parts aren’t, it might be wise to get the kiddywinkies studying Economic History and the History of Economic Thought. Perhaps, equipped with with fact-based stuff, they’ll do less harm.

  2. The Pedant-General

    “Perhaps, equipped with with fact-based stuff, they’ll do less harm.”

    Possibly true.

    “it might be wise to get the kiddywinkies studying Economic History and the History of Economic Thought.”

    Unfortunately that method is almost guaranteed to ensure that they don’t get any of the fact-based stuff.

  3. “the British state had embraced global liberalism”

    Quite true – the British did what they liked, while everyone else could get stuffed.

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