So how\’s that hopey, changey thing workin\’ out for ya?

Obama is arguing the executive has the power to execute American citizens without a trial, without even so much as an airing of the charges against them, and that it can do so in complete secrecy, with no oversight from any court, and that the families of the executed have no legal recourse.

Hmm.

So yeah. Tyranny. If there’s more tyrannical power a president could possibly claim than the power to execute the citizens of his country at his sole discretion, with no oversight, no due process, and no ability for anyone to question the execution even after the fact . . . I can’t think of it.

Not all that well, eh?

10 thoughts on “So how\’s that hopey, changey thing workin\’ out for ya?”

  1. What’s curious is the implication that it would be fine to execute non-American non-combatants far from warzones, too.

    Interesting times.

    Incidentally, I hear there is no arrest warrant nor extradition request for the chap that this is about.

  2. “Similar to other extradition requests, I imagine.”

    I know you mean well, but there ain’t no extradition treaty between the USA and Yemen so your clever-dick remark is, well, just that of a know-nothing clever-dick.

  3. I could be wrong here chaps, but I don’t think an extradition treaty is strictly necessary. The way I understand it Country A can still request that Country B arrests and deports one of its citizens, the process is just more involved and lengthy.

    All a treaty does is streamline the process and set out various limits beforehand. Without a treaty these have to be discussed and argued about every time an application is made.

    That’s why villains love countries without exctradition treaties. Not because extradition is impossible, just that it’s so bloody difficult, most countries can’t be arsed to go through all the pain just to get their hands on a bank robber or two.

  4. @GeoffH: “I know you mean well, but there ain’t no extradition treaty between the USA and Yemen so your clever-dick remark is, well, just that of a know-nothing clever-dick.”

    So you can only request someone’s extradition if there’s an extradition treaty in place?

  5. @Caz: Well you can ‘request’ but it ain’t going to get you far with a hostile power. Or a lawless one. Or one that simply wants to thumb its nose at you.

    I should think all three apply to the Yemen.

    If there’s a lawyer on here who specialises in this sort of area knows of any instance were the lack of a treaty was no obstacle to a normal, legal process of extradition, I’d be glad to hear it.

    I won’t be holding my breath.

  6. “Yemen’s government has announced it will not extradite Anwar al-Awlaki, the U.S.-born jihadist cleric who is credited with inspiring the recent wave of anti-American terrorist plots by al Qaeda recruits.

    “Over the weekend, Yemeni Foreign Minister Abu Bakr al Qirbi said Mr. al-Awlaki would be tried in the Arabian Peninsula state once he is captured.”

    Washington Post, May 2010

    “Yemen continues to harbor a number of Al Qaeda operatives and has refused to extradite several known militants on the FBI’s list of most wanted terrorists. (Article 44 of the constitution states that a Yemeni national may not be extradited to a foreign authority.) ” – Wikipedia

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