The glory that is Greece

You know, we\’re in a political and economic union with these people.

And yes, they do help to determine what the law is in our own country.

We really do need to leave the European Union, we really do.

In just the past decade the wage bill of the Greek public sector has doubled, in real terms—and that number doesn’t take into account the bribes collected by public officials. The average government job pays almost three times the average private-sector job. The national railroad has annual revenues of 100 million euros against an annual wage bill of 400 million, plus 300 million euros in other expenses. The average state railroad employee earns 65,000 euros a year. Twenty years ago a successful businessman turned minister of finance named Stefanos Manos pointed out that it would be cheaper to put all Greece’s rail passengers into taxicabs: it’s still true. “We have a railroad company which is bankrupt beyond comprehension,” Manos put it to me. “And yet there isn’t a single private company in Greece with that kind of average pay.” The Greek public-school system is the site of breathtaking inefficiency: one of the lowest-ranked systems in Europe, it nonetheless employs four times as many teachers per pupil as the highest-ranked, Finland’s.

5 thoughts on “The glory that is Greece”

  1. They’ve been a fascist country until the ’80s, still behave like fascists (see EAW outrages passim) and are being propped up by us.

    Kick the props out and let them sink into the mire of their own making. They can clear the mess up themselves. Or not. Either way, I don’t care to have anything to do with them.

  2. What a fabulous article. I’ve been mocking my Greek friends for their missed chance to earn their fortune back home as a station master.

  3. wonderful article – thank you.

    I love the Greeks, even after all this.

    If Greece makes you hate the EU, visit Bulgaria.

    just one question: what’s Ambien?

  4. The Greek public-school system is the site of breathtaking inefficiency: one of the lowest-ranked systems in Europe, it nonetheless employs four times as many teachers per pupil as the highest-ranked, Finland’s.

    With one sentence NuLabour’s entire spending policy is topedoed as effectively as Great Grandad Remittance’s destroyer.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *