Those solar tariffs

German energy developer juwi Solar is considering implementing 60MW of solar installations in the UK over the next two years. Amiram Roth-Deblon, head of business development of juwi Solar, said the proposed FiT rate “does not reflect the market price … especially if the rates are compared to the German tariff, which is a mature market”.

Well, no, of course the tariff rates do not reflect the market price. That\’s the whole point of them, to not be the market price.

Blimey, some people.

3 thoughts on “Those solar tariffs”

  1. Germany is a mature market, eh?
    ” Feed in Tariffs in Germany
    The most famous feed in tariff scheme has been the Renewable Energy Law (Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz) of 2000 in Germany which followed their Energy Feed in Law (Stromeinspeisungsgesetz) of 1991. These laws have seen feed in tariff rates set for the full range of renewable energy sources and installed capacities with particular focus on solar photovoltaic installations.

    The feed in tariff for solar systems rated at less than 30kW has been a whopping 57.4 euro cents per kWh paid for 20 years after installation! Understandably there has been massive take-up of domestic PV solar in Germany.

    It has however been calculated that the cost per tonne of carbon saved by this subsidising of solar power in this way has been 900 Euro which is 30 times the cost of a carbon credit certificate. Subsidising large scale wind farms instead of domestic solar installations would have reduced Germany’s carbon emissions for a lot less mone helping them to reach their carbon reduction commitments much more quickly.

    (spits out dummy…)

  2. …….Subsidising large scale wind farms instead of domestic solar installations would have reduced Germany’s carbon emissions for a lot less mone helping them to reach their carbon reduction commitments much more quickly…….

    It would not however have been nearly so good for rich Germans with large roofs.

  3. The point they may have been trying to make is that the tariffs don’t reflect the market price for buying the solar panels.
    Although given the self-interest of the people saying this, and the lack of specific numbers in the report to justify this, I find their claims of this being an absolute disaster implausible.

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