\’Ang on a minute, these Danes have got Marmite all wrong

Notwithstanding the actions we must take in Operation Marmite, the Danes have managed to get the ban all wrong anyway.

On purely scientific grounds.

The Danish Veterinary and Food Administration has allegedly made the importation of Marmite illegal, apparently on the grounds that the yeast extract is fortified with vitamin B, and therefore doesn\’t meet strict safety guidelines.

Umm, what? Vitamin B?

Vitamin B12, vitamin B12 or vitamin B-12, also called cobalamin, is a water soluble vitamin with a key role in the normal functioning of the brain and nervous system, and for the formation of blood.

And yes, it is B12 that it is enriched with.

Water soluble? And there\’s the rub.

It\’s a minor, but possible, worry that people will get too much/many of the fat soluble vitamins. For example, possible Vitamin A overdose is why you should never eat the liver of a carnivore (yes, people have died from eating bear liver, stranded arctic explorers and the like).

But with the water soluble vitamins it\’s near impossible to get an overdose: you\’ll piss it all away long before anything else happens.

So, foul, oppressive, Rotten State of Denmark and wrong with it to boot. I vote we bomb them.

9 thoughts on “\’Ang on a minute, these Danes have got Marmite all wrong”

  1. Aha!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vegemite

    As I suspected. It’s yet another chapter in the ongoing Spreadable Comestible War we’ve been having with our antipodean cousins these last 90 years.
    Vegemite contains no added B12.
    (And for Dearime’s benefit – also tastes like foul muck)

  2. Re: Johnny Bonk

    I think you’re right – this kind of requirement definitely counts as an indistinctly applicable measure equivalent to a quantititiave restriction under the EU’s Article 34. To get away with it, Denmark would have to successfully argue that the measure was proportionate to the risk to public health – this would bring them within Article 36 or the Cassis de Dijon exception. If its B12, there’s no risk that you can have too much – they haven’t got a legal leg to stand on.

    Looks like it might be worth donating to the Marmite fighting fund!

  3. My understanding is that marmite’s not been banned for being marmite but has fallen foul of a regulation covering a host of vitamin stuff.

    Which is likewise daft and probably illegal.

    Denmark’s legal leg will be that the ban is justified under Article 30 and further applies equally to Danish products as any other EU product so the ban does not infringe Article 28 anyway. And as Tim pointed out, a retail ban in Denmark hardly infringes free movement of goods because you can just order the stuff from overseas.

    Paradoxically the ban might actually increase overseas trade if people buy the same amount of marmite, but pay retail price to a UK supplier, rather than retail to a Danish supplier who pays wholesale for their imported stock. It therefore doesn’t make any sense to interpret this as a protectionist measure (as if the miniscule Danish market for marmite is worth any bureaucrat’s time to help out nonexistent Danish competitors), so I can only assume the ban has been implemented because some twat genuinely believes it’s in the public interest to implement the ban.

    There are far stranger goings on in the Kingdom of Denmark at the moment.

  4. Can we ban Danish ryebread in revenge?
    I used to live in Denmark and could never find any of the food of heaven (Marmite) so I got it sent to me in the post.

  5. For example, possible Vitamin A overdose is why you should never eat the liver of a carnivore (yes, people have died from eating bear liver, stranded arctic explorers and the like).

    In think it was the bear objecting that actually killed them.

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