Substandard care homes

So we are told:

More than 1,800 homes for the old and disabled are not providing decent care, with staff even failing to ensure that the frail and vulnerable are properly fed, the statistics from watchdogs reveal.

Campaigners said elderly people were being left in conditions which would not befit a dog, as shocking failings became \”systemic\” amid a deepening crisis in the sector.

Foul, yes.

But sadly there will be those who will have a political field day with the numbers rather than actually try and work out what\’s going wrong.

I can\’t find the actual report that is being referred to:

When spot checks were carried out on hundreds of care homes and nursing wards earlier this year they showed one in three were failing some of the watchdog\’s standards.

Ah, did you spot that little bit? Nursing wards?

Yes, for the CQC, who compiled the figures:

We regulate care provided by the NHS, local authorities, private companies and voluntary organisations.

Yes, this includes (or at least I assume it includes, for it includes nursing wards and those are provided by the NHS) state provided services as well as private sector provided.

Which is where the politics comes in. There will be those (I can name a few off the top of my head) who will insist that bad care in the private sector means that everything must be state provided. This could even be true: but to check what we\’d need to look at is the break down between private services doing things badly and public sector services doing things badly.

Which we don\’t as yet have so we cannot make any comparison at all.

The politics won\’t stop there either. Allow me the conceit that public sector results will be as bad as (possibly worse than) private sector. If true, we\’ll be told that public sector failings are simply because of a lack of money. While private sector will be because of the inherent inability of the private sector to provide such services: despite one of the private sector problems being the public sector lowering the amount they\’re willing to pay for services.

Ho hum.

I will admit to being rather confused by certain peoples\’ reactions to these sorts of things. I can understand, even if disagree with, those who wanted to nationalise the railways, mines, steel works and all the rest. They (mistakenly in my view) thought that ownership of these commanded great power over the economy. Thus, to give power to the people it was necessary for the people to own them.

With care homes it\’s a purely utilitarian calculation: which system provides the best care for the least amount of money? There is no power nexus to be controlled here.

But we still seem to get that atavistic knee jerk reaction from the archaic left. we must have state ownership, well, because. Come on guys, old folks homes are hardly the commanding heights of the economy now, are they?

7 thoughts on “Substandard care homes”

  1. Surreptitious Evil

    old folks homes are hardly the commanding heights of the economy now, are they?

    Indeed. But ‘I’ am unlikely to find myself down the mine, driving a train or working in the steel mill. But ‘I’ am quite likely to find myself in an old folk’s (folk being plural, I think) home at some point – even if it is an NHS Geriatric Ward.

    Therefore there is a high degree of vested self-interest. I’ll grant you the economic ignorance. But that is why they are “left and proud”.

  2. I have a son who is a Downs person. He has lived in various care homes for the past 15 years of his own volition. Some have been better than others. As in all human endeavour, the degree of supervision by outside interested parties has a direct effect on the standards of the institution. In the case of the elderly, where robust relatives or a diligent trustee make it their business “to keep an eye on Mum”, the standard is high. i have had experience of 2 NHS geriatric wards in different parts of the country. In both cases, the standard of care was appalling. Both my mother and mother-in-law were neglected, and basic bodily needs were ignored except when their children were visiting. In both cases, complaints were ignored, both on the ward and higher up the chain. The management structure was carefully organised so that no one person could be held responsible for what was basically a denial of human rights.
    In the private sector, one has the choice of moving the person in care to another home or hospital. In the public sector, in practice no such option is available. Private care is by no means perfect – it’s just that the alternative is so much worse.

  3. I’d simply refer you to your subsequent post, above. They control because they can control. The point of public sector care is to provide employment for public sector care workers.

  4. On the occasions when I have discussed the topic with demented lefties, their normal objection is that it it immoral to profit from the care of the elderly. Just as it is immoral to profit from education, health care, etc. etc. Who gives a fuck about the actual results, provided lefties can take a moral stance they can self-righteously wave at everyone else?

  5. “their normal objection is that it it immoral to profit from the care of the elderly. Just as it is immoral to profit from education, health care, etc. etc”

    But it is of course only immoral if you profit as an owner not if you profit as an employee….

  6. On the occasions when I have discussed the topic with demented lefties, their normal objection is that it it immoral to profit from the care of the elderly.

    This comes back to Timmy’s point about ignorance.

    Most lefties can’t grasp the massive performance differences that competition brings, because most of them are either students, in the public sector, or working very junior jobs in the private sector.

    On top of that, they always assume that bosses just got there through luck or evil, not being smart, taking risks and hard work. I know guys who lost tens of thousands on building online social networks.

    Then when they blame “business”, they always pick examples which have almost nothing to do with free markets, like the absurd payments to government contractors, the bank bailouts or rail.

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