The effects of climate change

From Plymouth to Portsmouth, sea levels surged by inches, after a submarine landslide.

No, climate change didn\’t cause a landslide. But the effects of the landslide were the same as one of the effects we\’re told that climate change will bring.

A rise in sea levels. \”A few inches\” (let us say, four or five) is equal to the predicted rise in sea level over the next four decades or so (ish, ish, 3 mm per year, 12 cm over 40 years, 5 inches near enough).

Don\’t forget, for SE England, some 50% (ish, ish, W. Stoat will no doubt be along to correct my numbers) of this is rebound from the ice age, not gorbal wormening at all.

Yes, climate change is a problem but it\’s a chronic, long term one, not an immediate disaster that requires throwing away the entirety of our industrial culture nor the burning of our wealth to beat.

From Plymouth to Portsmouth, sea levels surged by inches, after a submarine landslide. \”It was quite violent in a way,\” one mariner reported unconvincingly. \”My dinghy was moving around.\” Other effects included \”lots of fish jumping\”, and women\’s hair standing on end at St Michael\’s Mount, where the air was charged with static.

6 thoughts on “The effects of climate change”

  1. Yes, climate change is a problem

    As there is to date precisely zero empirical evidence of this, I fear that I must strongly disagree with your assertion.

  2. Don’t give a monkey’s about the climate change nonsense but would suggest that someone in the south-east goes out and has a look at undersea conditions. The little one might just be a harbinger of a much bigger one to come.

  3. Mr Ecks is on the money.An underwater landslide is thought by a geezer at Bath Spa University, no less, to have caused a tsunami that swept over Somerset and parts of Wales in 1607 doing no end of damage.Susan Watts of the BBC,no sensationalist (to put it mildly,David Kelly and all that) adduced this event as a reason to have doubts about the wisdom of siting nuclear power stations in the Bristol Channel.Unbelievably Sizewell was planned with the possibility of tsunamis in mind! Nothing to worry about for Mr W ,but the Final Arbiter,house prices will have something else to say about it if water gets into British nuclear reactors.

  4. There’s a hypothesis that if the side of Cumbre Vieja in the Canaries slides off into the Atlantic, it will be very unfortunate for anyone with shorefront property in the Americas or Southern England (Portugal would likely not experience a happy outcome, either.) I live 3500′ above sea level, so I wouldn’t be directly affected, but it would probably be a bad thing for the global economy if New York, Boston and Miami were washed away.

  5. While I agree with you, think you’re wrong to use this as an example

    A rise in sea levels. “A few inches” (let us say, four or five) is equal to the predicted rise in sea level over the next four decades or so (ish, ish, 3 mm per year, 12 cm over 40 years, 5 inches near enough).

    The problem with comparing a one-off event with an aggregate rise is that the one-off isn’t that big, and is within the scope of ‘normal’ big rises (very high tides, etc).

    But if the aggregate level goes up 5 inches, then the freak high tides, or even this event, will do some serious damage to areas that, currently, are perfectly safe.

    I’m, obviously, thinking of places like Torre Abbey meadows &c, which can already be in trouble in a high storm, but if the aggregate level is up at the level of the freaks, then the new freak events will do a lot of damage.

    And what happens if sea level goes up by, say, 5 inches, there’s a spring tide, and one of these landslides?

  6. MikeinAppalachia

    Wait! You forgot the asteroid strike, can’t forget that one.
    in your assumed event, the spring tide and the effect of the landslide would be 5 inches higher.

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