It\’s certainly one explanation

In an interview with a local newspaper, Sir Stephen said:……….“There is something fundamentally wrong with the nursing profession and the way it is focussed at the moment.

You\’re in a position to know, certainly.

Unions and professional bodies have suggested that the problems are down to staff being over-worked or forced to focus on Government targets rather than providing personal care.

But other commentators have claimed that too much care is now provided by cheap healthcare assistants, who do not need to meet national training standards and who are not regulated by a professional body; or that nurses think they are “above” feeding and cleaning patients now that they have to be university-educated.

That last fits my prejudices: when you\’ve professionalised all the nurses you still need someone to do the nursing.

Certainly, if those stories of the elderly dying through dehydration are correct there most certainly is something wrong with nursing.

9 thoughts on “It\’s certainly one explanation”

  1. Unfortunately, his answer seems to have been decided in advance:

    “Their plans, to be disclosed in September, will focus on how nurses can be trained for “the real world of the NHS rather than the classroom”. “

    What does that mean? What sort of people are we recruiting if ‘Put down ‘Heat’ magazine and go see that the patient has eaten their lunch’ needs to be spelled out explicitly in training?

  2. As someone who lived with nurses at uni (woohoo!), they do get their hands well and truly dirty.

    Wiping shit, holding the hands of people as they die, trying to make people with dementia drink, you know, nursing.

    You probably need to go meet some nurses before maligning the profession.

  3. “You probably need to go meet some nurses before maligning the profession.”

    My father endured several months worth of ineffectual, lackadasical, incompetent ‘care’ – on different wards, at different times – before his death.

    I’ll never forget having to hunt down a so-called nurse to point out that maybe his arm (which had been used several times a day for blood pressure checks) shouldn’t be swollen to the size it was, and that perhaps the catheter in it was a four-day use one that had been in for over six days might be the problem.

    So I’ve met enough. No desire whatsoever to meet more…

  4. IMO, senior HCAs are now the equivalent of the old state-enrolled nurses (but without the pay or recognition).

    There is a big difference between things going wrong because of neglectful behaviour (ignoring cries for assistance) – and things going wrong because there simply aren’t enough boots on the ground (being unable to assist). It doesn’t help that the two issues are so readily conflated by the media. The [inevitable] consequences of raised acuity on general wards and ridiculous short-staffing will still be reported as nurses being ‘too posh to wash’. I have no problem with individuals being found culpable for poor practice, but I don’t much care for the entire profession being derided as such – nobody where I work sits around reading Heat at the nurses’ station.

    As for the senior nursing hierarchy – yes, generally, I spit on them. They should have fought the reduction in medical cover tooth & nail, & not treated it as some kind of glorious opportunity. And yes, kids in training need to be taught stuff they can pull out of the hat at 3 in the morning (often whilst under extreme pressure), not faux-sociology drivel. That said, it’s absurd to pin the blame on newer generations of nurses (slagging off Project 2000 intakes being the classic) – aptitude in care will always shine through, whatever your age or training.

  5. “…and things going wrong because there simply aren’t enough boots on the ground (being unable to assist). “

    Not an issue in this hospital, the place was drowning in staff. Sadly, they were mostly rude, uncaring, and unprofessional. It’s nice to know no-one sits around reading ‘Heat’ where you work, though…

  6. It’s nice to know no-one sits around reading ‘Heat’ where you work, though…

    Largely because the Senior Sister in Emergency (Surgical) Admissions has all of the three qualities requisite in senior nursing staff: i. we like her (she’s very funny, leads from the front) ii. we respect her (we would follow her to Hell and back) & iii. we are bloody terrified of her (but in a good way).

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