Sunny of the Day

Sunny Hundal wants to jail one of his own contributors. I always knew he was a rum\’un.

Plus, what is tax evasion and tax avoidance if not (legalised, in the latter case) looting? This sort of looting requires two factors: a herd mentality (which reduces individual risk) and the expectation that the rule of law won’t hinder them.

Tax avoidance is the same as looting and rioting.

Thus those who advise upon tax avoidance, those who urge it, are guilty of incitement to riot.

Mr. Murphy.

Now, you might say that that\’s not tax avoidance, not tax abuse. But Richard Murphy himself has said that exactly that is indeed both tax abuse and tax avoidance.

It is thus, as Sunny Hundal says, morally, legally and logically the same as incitement to riot.

So that\’s hard time in pokey for you Mr. Murphy. Sunny says so.

8 thoughts on “Sunny of the Day”

  1. I think that you forgot the most important difference between tax planning and tax avoidance: When Mr Murphy does it is purer than pure and totally moral, therefore absolutely fine. When anybody else does it it is the moral equivalent of throwing premature babies from their incubators, and therefore should be treated as a crime.

  2. what really annoys me is when people think tax avoidance and evasion are the same thing. They are not.

    avoidance = planning to ensure you pay the correct amount of tax and not a penny more.

    evasion = lying to reduce your tax bill.

    There is admittedly a grey area, but I wish MSM would get it right.

    @Chris Strange “difference between tax planning and tax avoidance” —- there is NO diffrence, they are the same thing!

  3. @ Piers W

    “avoidance = planning to ensure you pay the correct amount of tax and not a penny more.”

    However (as I have pointed out before) suppose you enter into some avoidance (and no putting your money in an ISA isn’t avoidance) but the courts decide that the aviodance attempted does not work, as, for example, here:

    http://www.bailii.org/cgi-bin/markup.cgi?doc=/ew/cases/EWCA/Civ/2009/622.html&query=Prudential&method=boolean

    So the avoidance wasn’t legal. What penaties or sanctions should there be for trying this on? At present there are none apart from paying the amount of tax you would have done if you hadn’t attemted the avoidance.

  4. @ ‘me’

    Indeed, a good point, and one which I was referring to when I said “admittedly there is a grey area”.

    In the case you quote the tax planning was found to be flawed, but this is only after the case was referred to the court of appeal. Clearly the technical aspects of the case were complicated and required resolution.

    The court made its decision and so Prudential has to pay the tax it should have.

    Prudential did not lie to HMRC or seek to hide what it had done, which would have been evasion and penalties would have automatically applied. In fact if this is some sort of tax avoidance scheme, then companies are explicitly required to declare such a scheme on their returns.

    Instead Prudential followed the tax advice provided by EY (a respected firm) and this advice was found to be flawed in an honest interpretation of tax legislation.

    I don’t see why penalties or sanctions should apply in this case. HMRC themselves say “if you take ‘reasonable care’ but still make a mistake, HMRC will not charge a penalty”.

  5. You said tax avoidance was “paying the correct amount of tax “. I gave you an instance of where tax avoidance was involved and the correct amount of tax was was not paid. As for EY being “a respected firm” this is a matter of opinion. Borrowing a word from Worstofall you are a cretin.

  6. @me

    In my opinion, a cretin is someone who doesn’t understand another’s viewpoint and then insults them.

    You gave an example where tax avoidance was involved and the correct amount of tax was not paid – and I explained that this was through an honest if flawed interpretation of tax legislation rather than deliberate evasion.

    I explained, in response to your previous comments, why I do not think penalties would be appropriate in such a case.

    People do make honest mistakes.

    So if you still don’t understand, fuck off.

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