Ritchie: Irish tax exile acuses Irish tax exile

This really is most amusing from our favourite Irish tax exile:

Actually Bob, lots of us would like to lecture you on your tax morals if you don’t pay in full what somebody else living in the UK might owe. I stress we don’t know whether you do or not, but you had the option of saying you do and got angry instead, which makes me think you’ve got something to get angry about.

And candidly, in that case Lucy Bannerman was absolutely right to question you as she did. Paying tax in the right place at the right time is a principle inextricably linked to solving the problems of poverty in Africa – and elsewhere. You can build as many ditches as you like. But candidly if you set an example by tax avoiding then you undo all your good works.

It’s your choice though Bob. You’ve no need to get angry. You can just either drop the non-dom claim or pay up instead. It’s not hard.

Bob Geldof being a non-dom you see. So he pays full whack on all his UK income in the UK. This not being enough for the Murphmeister.

But there\’s more to it than this. The Murph has been insisting that actually, tax should not be paid upon this either domicile or residence basis. But upon citizenship. You have a passport from a place then you\’re gaining something from that citizenship and thus you should be paying tax to that State.

And the Murph is on an Irish passport. And Irish taxation of his sort of income would be higher than UK tax on said income. He is, therefore, an Irish tax exile.

He who would cast the first stone etc….

26 thoughts on “Ritchie: Irish tax exile acuses Irish tax exile”

  1. Consistency? From the Murphmeister? Lolololol.

    UK companies trading abroad should pay their tax in the UK! But foreign countries trading in the UK should not pay their tax in foreign! Philip Green owns his wife!

    I’ve finally figured out what he really wants. All companies, all people, wherever they are based, wherever they trade, should pay tax in the UK.

  2. #1
    Yes, that’s probably the only way he could raise enough revenue to fund his *courageous state*

  3. @Noel, he says “he was brought up in the UK”, not that he was born in the UK. But until we see his birth certificate I don’t think we can say if he is a tax exile or not.

  4. Surely, if the Murphmeister has a UK passport AND an Irish passport he should be paying tax twice?

    But lets be fair and allow him to use the UK / Irish Double Tax Treaty to reduce his taxes offset his UK tax bill with the tax paid in Ireland. That should be sufficient to help out our friends across the water.

  5. @ John Galt // May 17, 2012 at 10:03 am

    “Surely, if the Murphmeister has a UK passport AND an Irish passport he should be paying tax twice?”

    Clears throat, deep breath.

    According to Article 8 of the European Union Maastricht Treaty he is a citizen of an association of 27 member states

  6. “Paying tax in the right place at the right time is a principle inextricably linked to solving the problems of poverty in Africa…”

    Call me thick but could someone explain this to me? The logic seems to need a bit of help leaping off the page and into my brain.

  7. @Clngram

    Ritchie and his cohorts criticism is that big multinationals who operate in Africa aren’t paying their dues there, hence the poverty on the continent.

    It has absolutely nothing to do with the ingrained corruption of the politicians/regimes there because governments are all fuzzy and cuddly and ALWAYS working in the best interest of the people.

  8. “Call me thick but could someone explain this to me? The logic seems to need a bit of help leaping off the page and into my brain.”
    Ah this accords with Richie’s Theory of Everything, where the Creator of the Universe was not an architect but an accountant & the answer to all questions lie in taxation. Thus there is a level of VAT cures cancer & a particular, weighty, item of HMRC stationery (identified by its rest mass) regularly exceeds the speed of light.

  9. “the problems of poverty in Africa” have more to do with too much socialism and not enough free trade.

    Who am I kidding? This is Murph! More tax solves everything.

  10. He loves “candidly”, doesn’t he? He uses it so often, including in the most bizarre places. He also loves misusing “respectfully”

  11. @Fatty

    It’s so that he can qualify his ad hominem attacks on people who disagree with him because he is being ‘polite’ to start with.

  12. @Doug Young: give Bob Geldorf a break. He’s not as sanctimonious as that other Irish git, Bono. Now there is a man whose face one could happily pound for hours……..

  13. @ Cingram
    I have tried to post the following on Taxresearch but I expect it will be suppressed because it refutes his claim:
    “Cameron’s commitment on overseas aid is linked to GDP not to tax receipts. HMRC’s net tax receipts from my income is reduced by my Gift Aid to Christian Aid and the Leprosy Mission (as well as to the Salvation Army et al who help the destitute in the UK). The more tax I “avoid”, the greater the reduction in inequality.”
    I am not ashamed to say that I support Christian Aid despite some of their staff falling for the “country-by-country” reporting scam that enriches accountants because the vast majority of their work helps to prevent or relieves humanitarian disasters.

  14. So Much For Subtlety

    Jim – “He’s not as sanctimonious as that other Irish git, Bono. Now there is a man whose face one could happily pound for hours……..”

    Thank you Jim. I was a bit worried that we got to comment 16 before someone mentioned Bono. It should have been much sooner.

    In fact in a whole range of threads, especially those dealing with Ireland or tax evasion, the first comment should point out Bono is a c*nt.

  15. Ever since someone pointed out his overuse of the word ‘candidly’, I can’t read any of his stuff without seeing it pop up all over the place. It’s a nasty little attention-deflecting word, rather akin to someone saying something breathtakingly insensitive, followed by “no offence.”

  16. So Much For Subtlety

    David Gillies – “Ever since someone pointed out his overuse of the word ‘candidly’, I can’t read any of his stuff without seeing it pop up all over the place. It’s a nasty little attention-deflecting word, rather akin to someone saying something breathtakingly insensitive, followed by “no offence.””

    You don’t think it has to do with his alternate persona as a brave teller of unpopular and dangerous truths? Every time he uses it he thinks of himself as a brave Crusader who is the only person in Britain willing to tell it like it us – regardless of the array of powerful forces who hate him for it?

  17. I mentally replace it with “Candida” and interpret it as him confessing to an especially persistent yeast infection.

  18. SMFS, I’m sure there’s an element of that sort of narcissistic self-delusion at work. He’s a feisty, transgressive little warrior, and he’ll be damned if the forces of reaction will stifle his truth-telling. It’s like when all the Lefties came out of the woodwork after 9/11 and shrieked “I’m being oppressed!” They were so busy being oppressed and silenced you couldn’t turn your TV on without seeing them.

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