Ritchie really does want a job, doesn\’t he?

After the scandals surrounding HMRC during the Hartnett era you’d think a new culture was needed in the organisation. One that was strongly pro-tax, against abuse and tax avoidance and that indicated a new, straight talking, down the line approach to big business with not a hint of cosiness or chumminess attached.

So who has just been appointed as the new chair of HMRC? Ian Barlow.
….
Banks must now be split.

Vastly greater government control is needed.

But so are new people on the boards of these banks who can be shown to have the moral leadership to drive a process of reform.

That\’s two jobs he\’s failed to get already today!

Hmm, wonder what\’s driving this? When does that Joseph Rowntree grant run out?

12 thoughts on “Ritchie really does want a job, doesn\’t he?”

  1. Difference is that Ian Barlow knows and understands tax law. Richard Murphy doesn’t.

  2. tory boys never grow up

    Leaving aside Mr Murphy’s qualifications and your personal animus against him – perhaps you should ponder the question as to whether it would be healthy or not to have at least some contrarian voices on the Board’s of our major banks and on the non executive board of the HMRC. Perhaps they might raise some questions abnd challenged some perceptions that the rest of the herd have singularly failed to do over the past few years. On the other hand you could just carry on with business as usual?

  3. TBNGU,

    Business as usual?

    Kind of like those among us who think (this time) just a bit more government, a bit more tax, a bit less freedom, will save the day and bring about utopia? If not, keep repeating and repeating and repeating and repeating……

  4. @ TBNGU
    I have significantly more (and more relevant) qualifications than Murphy and am noted for expressing contrarian views. I also have a habit of telling the truth. Should I be waiting breathlessly for an invitation to join the Board of Barclays?

  5. tory boys never grow up

    Georges

    I am not sure that a bit more governance and a bit less freedom within Barclays and other banks wouldn’t be a good thing. As for Mr Diamond and his ilk paying their fair whack of tax – perhaps if they did others could then pay less.

    john77

    I wouldn’t hold your breath – but I think you get my point that constructive criticism seems to have been in pretty short supply within the City in recent years.

  6. @ TBNGU. “As for Mr Diamond and his ilk paying their fair whack of tax –”

    What would a fair whack be? I only ask just so I know when it has been reached. After all “fair” is a bit vague.

  7. “As for Mr Diamond and his ilk paying their fair whack of tax – perhaps if they did others could then pay less.”

    Um, Mr Diamond is a paid employee of Barclays Bank plc. As such he is on PAYE. His earnings are a matter of record. He will be paying income tax at the rates demanded by Parliament – for the vast majority of his income at 50% recently. How much more does he have to pay to pay his ‘fair share’? A special Bob Diamond tax that no-one else has to pay?

  8. @ TBNGU
    NO, you are basing a claim on what you have read in the press. A market depends on there being different views on he value of what is traded – otherwise there would be no buyers and no sellers.
    I have been supplying constructive criticism for forty years, so I am tempted to say that you don’t know what you are talking about.
    @ Jim One of the complaints with which I sympathised was that Barclays paid Bob Diamond extra to cover his Delaware income tax. *******self-censored

  9. One of the complaints with which I sympathised was that Barclays paid Bob Diamond extra to cover his Delaware income tax.

    You might be sympathetic but this is common in multinationals at the more senior level where an exec will be in-the-pocket income disadvantaged by moving where the work is.

    On the other hand, I used to put in, each year, for 1/3 the difference between my pay (on the Edinburgh scale) and the London equiv (minus the London weighting). They never quite stopped sniggering …

  10. So Much For Subtlety

    tory boys never grow up – “Leaving aside Mr Murphy’s qualifications and your personal animus against him – perhaps you should ponder the question as to whether it would be healthy or not to have at least some contrarian voices on the Board’s of our major banks and on the non executive board of the HMRC.”

    Sure. I strongly believe banks will be improved enormously if every meeting has to be stopped for ten minutes while the token fruit cake down the end of the table rants about Jews from Outer Space putting fluoride in the water.

    Contrarian voices are not all they are cracked up to be.

    “Perhaps they might raise some questions abnd challenged some perceptions that the rest of the herd have singularly failed to do over the past few years.”

    Sure. We have not really considered the idea that Jewish lizards from Outer Space are trying to poison the water supply. Shame on us.

    “On the other hand you could just carry on with business as usual?”

    Britain is the fifth largest economy in the world and one of the richest countries. I think that we are doing fine despite the finest advice Ritchie can offer.

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