The truth about food and the environment

I suspect the really eco-friendly way to shop is “go to the biggest supermarket you can in the smallest vehicle you can as late in the day as you can”; but cycling to the 24-hr Tesco at midnight isn’t quite as glamorous as striking up a conversation with the surprisingly handsome and well-read farmer’s son in the “local” farm shop.

9 thoughts on “The truth about food and the environment”

  1. Whatever rocks your boat. I’ll stick with the farmer’s daughter with a glint in her eye.

  2. A new greengrocer has opened near us. His mangoes are infinitely better than Tesco’s. And he stocks samphire.

  3. GOM
    Not in Flanders you wouldn’t. What the Flanders farmer looks for in a wife is a lass, if the horse is sick, he can harness up & carry on ploughing. If the attendees at Ieper market are anything to go by, that’d be with two ploughs & she’d also carry the horse.

  4. The handsome and well-read farm-owners son, perhaps, but not the immigrant cabbage-pickers nor the calloused-handed labourers. Only the landowner makes any decent money.

  5. “I’ll stick with the farmer’s daughter …” Ah yes, nicely roasted with parsnips and apple sauce.

  6. What is this “crookedtimber” thing? My PC won’t let me access or download it. (Interest whetted by mention of handsome farmowner’s son.)

  7. The point about food miles in the original CT post (that the comment is on) is also important. It uses less energy to ship tomatoes from warm places than to grow them in a heated greenhouse. Even peas flown from Africa can be reasonable, since there’s generally a massive gap in payloads going in and out (people fly a great deal of stuff in, and the hold’s half-empty for the return trip).

  8. A new greengrocer has opened near us. His mangoes are infinitely better than Tesco’s. And he stocks samphire.

    None of the greengrocers in my town knows what samphire is, far less can supply it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *