Err, Yes?

Energy prices: Turning up the political heat
Can the Prime Minister really do anything to lower households’ soaring gas and electricity bills?

As the article says:

But environmental taxes have significantly added to a bill. Green taxes account for around £75 of a £1,000 bill and this is set to double to £150 over the next three years.

So scrap the idiocies and see the price fall.

The important question of course is whether that\’s sensible. I would argue that it is: even if you are worried about climate change then a straight and simple carbon tax would be considerably cheaper than this Godawful mess we have presently.

5 thoughts on “Err, Yes?”

  1. ‘Green taxes’ only add 7.5%?

    May I suspect that most green expenses do not reach the electricity bill?

  2. British Gas keep pointing out to their customers that their profit is only 5%. The lefties keep blaming the companies for the price rises.

  3. He has to do something.

    If the predicted harsh winter comes, he’ll have a lot of excess deaths hung around his neck.

    Tough to get reelected on.

  4. “even if you are worried about climate change then a straight and simple carbon tax would be considerably cheaper than this Godawful mess we have presently”

    How about if you’re not?

    I think the taxes should be charged in ‘climate futures’, which are bonds that pay out at an attractive rate if a certain climate outcome does, or does not, come to pass by a set date. For example, a bond that pays out 10%/yr compound on face value on the day sea level rise exceeds 1 metre, voided in 2100. Both the bonds and the liabilities can be traded.

    Their value depends on whether you believe, so non-believers won’t mind paying in them because they think they’re worthless, and believers can scarcely refuse them because they believe them to be a dead cert. Then everybody is happy, and the market decides the price.

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