Go and read this

No, go on.

A baby could neither be enslaved, nor marched to the gas chamber alone. And so her mother had to carry her to both their deaths.

13 thoughts on “Go and read this”

  1. “a secretary in Berlin, sitting erect at a typewriter, carefully preparing a list of fellow-humans to be transported to their deaths”

    Of course, the secretary didn’t see Jews as “fellow-humans”…Jews were dehumanised, or at least sub-human, to Nazis.

  2. You know, it is not hard to see which people in the UK would quite happily serve a tyrant in sending people to labour or extermination camps were they given the opportunity. Many a sneering official, drunk with authority, I could easily imagine herding people into railway cars and, probably, enjoying themselves as they did so.

    I guess all countries have them. When I was living in Sakhalin, I had the misfortune of working for a despicable little shit, a weasly man in his early 20s with the physique of an underdeveloped teenager who had been born to KGB parents in the USSR and, as such, with a silver spoon in his mouth. He was bright, and learned English very well and very quickly, but some clot in the UK made him director of the Russian subsidiary. The manner in which he dealt with people made me thankful that the USSR had ended and he was no longer able to assume his natural role: that of a snitch, or a petty bureaucrat who decided who did or did not starve. Much to my disappointment, he left Russia to work in London instead of being hauled off into the army.

  3. I read a fascinating history of barbed wire once. (Just checked on amazon, no trace.)
    Originally a packaging product, basically, to pen livestock, if memory serves invented in America shortly after the Civil War.

    I wonder if the humble egg box (invented 1911) could be perverted to such evil ends?

  4. Originally a packaging product, basically, to pen livestock, if memory serves invented in America shortly after the Civil War.

    I always assumed it was used during the Civil War. But come to think of it, it was never specifically mentioned. So yes, perhaps afterwards. I did know it was invented for keeping livestock in position.

  5. Blokeinfrance – yes, initially all it was created for was a cheap and mass produced method of keeping animals in an area. Could cause them to not break a fence, could be a temporary blockage on a hole in a fence or a way of running up a metal fence very quickly.
    Think we used it in concentration camps early in 20th century (Boer war) and then used massively in WW1 onwards…
    Then tank designed partly to deal with very rough terrain, partly trenches, partly barbed wire.

  6. In Menotti’s opera “The Consul”, written at the height of the Cold War, the Secretary’s job is to prevent people getting the necessary papers to allow them to leave the country. The faces of the people whose hopes she has dashed still haunt her after long after they have gone……

    Maybe not quite so chilling as the secretary’s job cited here, but the same mindset. Perhaps the names of the people whose deaths she had helped to ensure haunted this secretary, too.

  7. So Much for Subtlety

    blokeinfrance – “I read a fascinating history of barbed wire once. (Just checked on amazon, no trace.)”

    Presumably this is the book famously reviewed by Edward Luttwak (I think) in the TLS or the like.

    Go and read that. It is one of the best reviews ever.

  8. So Much for Subtlety

    Tim Newman – “You know, it is not hard to see which people in the UK would quite happily serve a tyrant in sending people to labour or extermination camps were they given the opportunity.”

    Well we have done this experiment. British people being not a little involved in the Trans-Atlantic Slave trade for instance. The sort of people who write great hymns as it turns out.

    That is to say, anyone.

    Theophrastus has it right. By the time British society got around to actually murdering people, the basis of society would have changed so that we would all, and I do mean all, think it was perfectly acceptable. No one would resist except the mentally ill or down right weird. As we can see with the Liverpool pathway or abortion or whatever. If you had told British veterans in WW2 that the result of their efforts was that old people would be starved to death to save money, they would not have believed you. Britain has changed. There is no reason why it would not change again.

    The individual has little power to resist what everyone tells him is right. If that means murdering millions, it means murdering millions.

  9. “You know, it is not hard to see which people in the UK would quite happily serve a tyrant in sending people to labour or extermination camps were they given the opportunity. Many a sneering official, drunk with authority, I could easily imagine herding people into railway cars and, probably, enjoying themselves as they did so.”

    I’m sorry to say I can’t see many of those who get the sharpe end of this blog coming out too well from that test. Once you’ve decided it’s OK to tell everyone else what they should do and think, it’s not a huge leap to deciding on who should live or die.

  10. The Mid-Sussex Car Parking enforcement people could easily be switched to this kind of job. When I complained about a ticket, which was caused by a council work-crew replacing a lamp post outside my drive, I was told “Not our council” (it was West Sussex) and “they may have asked you to clear your drive, but did not tell you to park illegally.” All this in an empty street with hardly any traffic !

    They have 19 people in the parking enforecement office.

    Alan Douglas

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