Mondays, eh?

So I walk the dogs. Hear muffled whining from a rubbish bin en route. New born pup. Umbilical attached. Still wet.

Won\’t survive of course. And I\’ll not drown it. The vet doesn\’t open for another 90 minutes.

So I\’ve got an hour and a half to get attached to something I\’m then go to take to be humanely put to sleep.

Thanks Monday morning, thanks a lot.

Update: and thus ends one very short life.

For Julia (and others). It\’s almost impossible to raise a puppy entirely by hand. If they\’ve suckled for a couple of days then it\’s possible. They need the colostrum, the antibodies. If they don\’t if they\’re purely on artificial milk, they tend to die at 4-5 weeks from one or other infection (usually a diarrhea).

We\’ve raised a pup from 3 weeks by hand, a kitten from 8-10 days or so. But right from birth it\’s almost impossible. Almost….and I\’m really not sure I can go through the grief of a death at 5 weeks after a month of 2 hourly feeds for 24/7.

Sadly.

21 thoughts on “Mondays, eh?”

  1. “…I’m really not sure I can go through the grief of a death at 5 weeks after a month of 2 hourly feeds for 24/7.”

    I can certainly sympathise with that.

  2. Or do what I have done to injured birds and other small mammals. Not done it to something bigger though, but the concept is the same. Get shovel, place on neck, stamp with foot on shovel. Quick.

  3. Dreadfully sad, but Tim was right on that one.

    Anyone born in the countryside knows that an abandoned mammal of any form rarely survives without the most expert of 24-hour care.

    A quick and relatively painless death soon after birth is not a great way of doing things, but it is probably the least worst.

    Well done Tim. I hope the fucker that abandoned the poor pup burns in hell for all eternity for that particular stunt.

  4. This brings one large lump in the throat.
    And fond memories of 3 wonderful friends, all rescues. 2 found abandoned.
    You’re doing the right thing, Tim, but that doesn’t help much, I know.

  5. “Dreadfully sad”? It’s a puppy not a human being.

    What do you think happens to the surplus male calves from the dairy industry? Or the male chicks from the egg industry?

  6. . If they don’t if they’re purely on artificial milk, they tend to die at 4-5 weeks from one or other infection…I’m really not sure I can go through the grief of a death at 5 weeks after a month of 2 hourly feeds for 24/7.

    I didn’t know this. Fair enough. Well done for easing it’s passing, at least.

    We’ve always had rescues (cats, but we live in the city) and each time I’ve harboured dark thoughts about the bastard that abandoned them.

  7. Good for you, Tim.

    What do you think happens to the surplus male calves from the dairy industry?

    If a living calf was dumped into a bin I’d find that pretty horrible as well.

  8. @PaulB: ‘“Dreadfully sad”? It’s a puppy not a human being.
    What do you think happens to the surplus male calves from the dairy industry? Or the male chicks from the egg industry?’

    Or the female chicks from the egg industry, for that matter.

    I think this is your autism playing up again, Paul. ‘Sad’ not being a word you can really comprehend.

    Thinking one thing is ‘sad’ doesn’t exclude, for humans, the possibility that another similar thing is also ‘sad’. That is, for your benefit, what happens to chicks and calves is also sad.

    We normals do tend to draw lines, though, so babies at one end of the scale, pupae at the other. Puppies, calves, chicks, at varying points in between.

    It is also entirely possible to eat meat and be ‘sad’ about some of what happens in the meat industry.

  9. The point, PaulB..? Well, I doubt you can comprehend it.

    But, just as those people who are needlessly rude to subordinates, people who are cruel or unfeeling to animals have something missing in their makeup.

  10. JuliaM: so, to be clear, the dreadful sadness is for the benighted soul who put the newborn puppy in the bin?

    Interested: you know nothing about my emotions. I suggest you go away for a year or two and think about which of us is showing signs of autism.

  11. “Thinking one thing is ‘sad’ doesn’t exclude, for humans, the possibility that another similar thing is also ‘sad’. That is, for your benefit, what happens to chicks and calves is also sad.”

    This is very true. I would go further, there are two ways of getting this wrong, one is to say that all animal deaths at the hands of humans are morally wrong and we should kill nothing as it is the equivalent of murder. The other is to shrug and say, it’s only an animal and what about all the baby chicks etc. Both views arise from a desire to shy away from reality, although the latter view pretends to be the realistic one. Nature wastes lives on a massive scale and sudden and painful death is the rule rather than the exception, which doesn’t mean we should ignore abandoned puppies or sanction cruelty to wild things or livestock. We have an empathetic and moral nature, which is what makes us human. As for all the dead young farm animals, an awareness of their fate and a refusal to take refuge in sentimental ideas of the sanctity of all life do not preclude sympathy. One of the saddest things I have ever read was an account by an old lady describing how, when young, she had to hold the unwanted lambs on the family farm so that her brother could slit their throats with a penknife, she said they cried like babies.

  12. @PaulB: ‘Interested: you know nothing about my emotions. I suggest you go away for a year or two and think about which of us is showing signs of autism.’

    Good comeback.

  13. “JuliaM: so, to be clear, the dreadful sadness is for the benighted soul who put the newborn puppy in the bin?”

    Not really , no, on him (possibly her) I wish only misfortune.

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