Ritchie on cuts in HMRC workforce

Quite so.

As a result of governemtn policy we’re destroying our ability to collect tax to pay for government.

The trouble is, that’s not by accident. That appears to be by design.

Could it be possible? That government would deliberately plan to reduce the ability to collect tax?

As part of the Spending Review on 12 July 2004, Gordon Brown estimated that 12,500 jobs would be lost as result of the merger by March 2008, around 14% of the combined headcount of Customs (then around 23,000) and Inland Revenue (then around 68,000). In addition, 2,500 staff would be redeployed to \”front-line\” activities. Estimates suggest this may save around £300 million in staff costs, out of a total annual budget of £4 billion. There are indications that, after March 2008, a further 12,500 jobs may also be cut.

The total number of job losses included policy functions within the former Inland Revenue and Customs which moved into the Treasury, so that the Treasury became responsible for \”strategy and tax policy development\” and HMRC took responsibility for \”policy maintenance\”. In addition, certain investigatory functions moved to the new Serious Organised Crime Agency, as well as prosecutions moving to the new Revenue and Customs Prosecution Office.

A further programme of job cuts and office closures was announced on 16 November 2006.[12][13] Whilst some of the offices closed will be in bigger cities where other offices already exist, many will be in local, rural areas, where there is no other HMRC presence. The numbers of job reductions and office closures has not been officially announced, but the proposals imply that up to 200 offices will close and a further 12,500 jobs were to be lost from 2008 to 2011.[14][15] In May 2009, staff morale in HMRC was the lowest of 11 government departments surveyed

Oh my, yes, it appears that it could!

Of course the problem a paid shill for PCS, the taxmans\’ union, has is that such a shill (if such a shill existed) would know this very well but would not be able to say it.

5 thoughts on “Ritchie on cuts in HMRC workforce”

  1. Brian, follower of Deornoth

    “Gordon Brown estimated that 12,500 jobs would be lost”

    “after March 2008, a further 12,500 jobs may also be cut”

    “A further programme of job cuts and office closures was announced on 16 November 2006”

    “a further 12,500 jobs were to be lost from 2008 to 2011”

    So, did any of these job cuts and sackings actually take place?

    “staff morale in HMRC was the lowest of 11 government departments”

    Cry me a river.

  2. With the impending doom that is Real Time Information I’m not at all sure whether there will be even less need for HMRC staff (as the public will be doing the donkey work) or more HMRC staff (because it’ll be a cockup).

  3. I spent a decade in the silly service. We were promised that computers would cut our workload, we were promised a cut in paperwork, we were promised the statistics would be far less needed as most would be computerised. Over time we had more work, more paper used (whatever happened to the paperless office idea of the early 1990s?) and usually one day a month entirely lost to counting files and paperwork for the stats.
    So expect more staff needed but more put on existing staff instead…

  4. There is an article in today’s Financial Times that says HMRC has collected 39% more (£434m vs £311m) from SMEs in tax and fines in 2011-2 than they they did in 2010-11 because they have had “initiatives focusing on the tax affairs of” (campaigns investigating) specific types of businesses.
    Basically get a few guys to actually understand what they are doing and you can achieve more with fewer people – no wonder PCS is paying Murphy to kick up a dishonest smokescreen!!

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