What a surprise! Willy Hutton is wrong!

So Ouur Wullie decides to tell us about Tyler Cowen\’s views.

Mr. Cowen begs to differ:

Such views make for a convenient target, but that is not close to what I wrote in The Great Stagnation. For instance on p.83 you will find me proclaiming, after several pages of details, “For these reasons, I am optimistic about getting some future low-hanging fruit.” Those are not Straussian passages hidden like the extra Nirvana audio track at the end of Nevermind. The very subtitle of the book announces “How America…(Eventually) Will Feel Better Again.”

Sigh.

Then there\’s the other stuff Wullie tells us:

Some argue that a dystopian world is emerging in which good jobs and full-time employment will become the preserve of an educated, computer-literate elite.

Oh for the Lord\’s Sake!

We don\’t actually want \”good jobs\” nor do we want full-time employment. What we want is the ability to consume as much as we can with the minimum amount of effort.

Which is exactly what mechanisation of anything at all brings us. The machines make it, we consume it and no sweated brows to be seen anywhere.

Seriously, who gives a fuck about the alphas all having to go to work as long as the rest of us have our flying cars?

5 thoughts on “What a surprise! Willy Hutton is wrong!”

  1. *Some argue that a dystopian world is emerging in which good jobs and full-time employment will become the preserve of an educated, computer-literate elite.*

    Working for the State.

    I laughed at the paragraph on micro-production. They’re called the self-employed and small businesses Will! The internet has allowed local businesses to go global.

    Near the end: *Firms and individuals will be on their mettle to open up, innovate and constantly reinvent themselves. If there is to be a successful Great Reset, Britain will need the open innovation structures, financing mechanisms and social support institutions to capitalise on the opportunities quickly, rather than be overwhelmed by the risks.*

    This means what – State directed investments with the shits trying to pick winners and market distorting welfarism? We’ve got that already.

    The final paragraph is also laughable.

  2. The Ruling Class most definitely want us to work all hours just for a roof over our heads and the wheels to trundle round to the nearest supermarket. According to Orwell ,they formerly contrived a continuous War Economy so as to make people go without what the machines would produce. Now they’ve got everybody working ,”the strivers” at least, to pay for continuously rising house prices running down the housing ladder which is of course moving. As it says at the end of Gatsby- a very tidy Marxist text- the dream is always out of reach.

  3. I think you are wrong about this. I think for many people once a certain level of consumption is reached, “something interesting or otherwise rewarding to do with my days” is more desirable than increased consumption. And whilst some people could achieve that working part time and haivng a hobby, for many of us a “good job” is what we’d like.

    I’m claiming something like this: if you took the subset of people who consider themselves to have a reasonably good job, and gave them leisure (unemployment) plus increased consumption (flying cars) instead, a good proportion would experience a decline in happiness.

  4. The tricky bit is of course to get all the machines to do the work while at the same time those people who’ ve been put out of work are supplied with enough money to buy what the machines produce. Major Douglas squared up to this problem after WW1 with his unearned-income- for-all scheme of National Dividends (Social Credit). Given the reception this idea gets when its proposed on here, this idea does not enjoy widespread support. So its up to you to propose something better.

  5. “What we want is the ability to consume as much as we can with the minimum amount of effort.”

    Not for me: I just want to be able to consume as much as I want using only the effort I want to put in. No min/maxing for me, I want a happy medium 🙂

    Some consumption isn’t worth the effort it takes; some effort is rewarding without consuming anything.

    But if I got my current salary for no work I’d be perfectly happy. Come to that I’d be happy with half the salary for half the work: the main reason I work full-time now is because it seems more prudent to build up the cash now and doss around later than to do it the other way round.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *