It’s none of your damn business

Forgive me sounding like a militant green type, but can this really be justified? It’s one thing to deliver a week’s supply of groceries to someone’s house. It’s another, surely, to deliver a product that they can get just by turning on their kitchen tap. After all, a week’s supply of bottled water for an entire family is a fairly hefty cargo to have to ferry about. If we are going to be environmentally aware about this, shouldn’t there be some exemption, in terms of online deliveries, for items such as water?

Indeed, shouldn’t governments be doing much more to discourage people from drinking bottled water in the first place? After all, the sheer amount of plastic being used to create the millions of bottles that are now drunk around the world every day is immense. In many of the less tidy countries that I visit these days in my job, the cities and countryside are festooned with empty bottles, and our oceans are rapidly going the same way.


Just fuck off will you
?

What people drink, how they drink it and how it is supplied to them is simply none of your damn business.

39 thoughts on “It’s none of your damn business”

  1. You must be referring to 500ml or 1ltr bottles. I get 19 ltr bottles, 3 or 4 at a time, because they contain no big brother ingredients to affect my family, such as fluoride, which is a poison. Besides, it tastes so much better than the lifeless tap water. Plus, I am expecting more “healthy” additives to be added sooner or later, from a man who says “I’m from the government and I’m here to help you”.

    Alan Douglas

  2. “In many of the less tidy countries that I visit these days ”

    Hahaha! How environmentally friendly is that?

  3. because they contain no big brother ingredients to affect my family, such as fluoride, which is a poison.

    And so is oxygen. However, in lower concentrations, both are vital for life.

    Anyway, back to the spirit of the OP – fuck Freeman and the great Greeny bansturbationist horse he rode in on.

    Drinking bottled water? I spent the summer in Afghanistan doing exactly that. And all the taps had “this is not drinking water” labels. At home? No need – I’m close enough to the home of “Highland Spring” anyway. In Paris? Of course. In Vienna? It’ll be lower quality than the tap water.

    But it’s entirely up to your personal preferences and budget. This is just another “Éoin Clarke coffee choice moment”.

  4. What I want to know is – all this plastic in the sea – who is dumping it there?

    Why is it the fault of the consumer?

    I mean, we’re told there is so much that I can’t believe it’s plastic bags blown off beaches, or ready-meal trays tipped overboard by cargo ship crews.

    So at least one garbage disposal entity is knowingly putting it there.

  5. “the millions of bottles that are now drunk around the world every day is immense.”
    It’s that “we see the world from our own experience” thing again. The countries where you can drink the water, straight out of the tap, are not that common. Certainly not mine. It’s got enough chlorine in it, you don’t want to get it in your eyes when showering.

  6. I think it sounds like a really good idea. Then, eventually, when this is the dominant way in which food is obtained they can also refuse to deliver anything else that ‘we’ don’t like.

    Food with too much fat in it, food with too much sugar, food with too much salt, food sourced from overseas, food that’s not grown organically, meat only in small amounts and only once a week, almost any type of fish, alcoholic drinks.

  7. I was musing over Alan’s 19ltr bottles.

    He must be bloody strong, to be able to pick one up and pour some water into a glass.

  8. I was think that Mr Barrett. Am I correct to think that 19 l of water would weigh about 19 kg – say 40 pounds or 3 stones! He must use a siphon or a pump.

  9. This from the Torygraph as well. And they wonder people are moving from holding their noses and voting Conservative to the None of the Above party.

  10. Yes, in the Telegraph. Soon it will be considerd extreme right wing to claim that people should be free to buy bottled water.

    Once bottled water was fashionable among the London middle-classes. Now that every fucker buys it means it has mysteriously become WRONG. See Apple products for the perfect example of this.

  11. Who puts all the plastic shit in the sea?

    Someone, please tell me. I’ve heard about this and it should stop. Now.

    Can we shoot them? It’s two crimes against humanity – it kills sweet wittwe dowphins and giant sqwids, and it makes self-confessed millitant gweenies want to make you and me wive in the stone age, while he flies first class around the world finding out what we are all doing wrong so he can tell us to stop doing it.

  12. All those plastic bottles end up in the North Pacific Gyre, the area (100 sq miles, 10,000 sq miles, take your pick) where all the ocean currents converge.

    FoE, GP and WWF have sent expeditions to document this huge dump. But they have never released the photos.

    So I conclude the obvious fact that the greenies are in the pay of the Koch brothers and Big Oil.

  13. @Diogenes The 19 liter bottles are placed upside down in a stand that has a tap. This is common in the USA; is it unusual in the UK?

  14. ZT, Diogenes

    I’ve seen them in offices: people lean on them and discuss last night’s TV… so they’re for drinking from, that explains why I’ve never seen any fish in them 🙂

  15. I laugh at anyone I see carrying around a water bottle and who isn’t exercising vigorously. There is no need to drink 2l of water a day if you are an office worker, you get enough from food and the coffeee consumed during the day. It’s just a marketing scam, just like the 5-a-day healthy eating campaign.

  16. Useful gossip
    Water cooler = parish pump = village well
    In our house we cal it “the kitchen”. That’s where the cups are.

  17. Here in China, an ‘untidy’ country I presume, you cannot throw away a plastic bottle or tin can without some old lady scurring from the shadows to collect it to sell for recycling. Maybe the greenies suicidal economic policies are designed to make us poor enough for recycling to be economically worthwhile?

  18. OT and just a suggestion, but could you widen the page a bit.

    Its only wide enough to fit about 1/2 to 2/3’s of a sentence on and its kinda hard to read some of these passages you quote with the indenting reducing that further.

  19. bloke in spain
    It’s that “we see the world from our own experience” thing again. The countries where you can drink the water, straight out of the tap, are not that common.

    I’ll second that – I lived in Sardegna for 4 years and while you *could* drink the tap water, you wouldn’t want to have to.

    Now I’m back in the states and living in the Sonora desert – again, our tap water is potable, but its full of dissolved minerals and tastes like crap.

  20. Diogenes
    I was think that Mr Barrett. Am I correct to think that 19 l of water would weigh about 19 kg – say 40 pounds or 3 stones! He must use a siphon or a pump.

    Its a (roughly) 5 gallon bottle – most likely stuffed on top of a dispenser. They’re fairly common in office settings – the old ‘standing around the water cooler talking about some recent event’ thing.

  21. bloke in france
    All those plastic bottles end up in the North Pacific Gyre, the area (100 sq miles, 10,000 sq miles, take your pick) where all the ocean currents converge.

    FoE, GP and WWF have sent expeditions to document this huge dump. But they have never released the photos.

    5 kilograms of plastic per square kilometer of ocean area – in the ‘high density’ areas. Almost all of it is particles too small to see with the naked eye.

  22. Rob: “Once bottled water was fashionable among the London middle-classes. Now that every fucker buys it means it has mysteriously become WRONG.”

    See also: critical backlash in left-wing papers against latest series of ‘Sherlock’.

    Once something’s popular, it’s out.

  23. Just how will people be able tell, from a respectful distance, that you are one of the bien pensant if you appear to like the same things as the proles?

  24. Even if there were huge areas of accumulated floating plastic out at sea , it would be easy enough to drop napalm and set them on fire, thus solving the problem rapidly.

  25. Mr Ecks
    If there were huge areas of accumulated floating plastic out at sea you wouldn’t be napalming it. You’d be hoovering it up & selling it for reprocessing.

  26. Humourless Canadian

    I have to say that the comments on this blog are far funnier and literate than what I see issuing from the attenuated lips of my grim countrymen. Although we do treasure fighting in hockey.

  27. So Much For Subtlety

    Mr Ecks – “Even if there were huge areas of accumulated floating plastic out at sea , it would be easy enough to drop napalm and set them on fire, thus solving the problem rapidly.”

    Most of the ocean is, biologically speaking, a desert. With lots of water. If you know what I mean. Something is lacking. One of those things is protection. You dump anything in the ocean and it provides a surface for all sorts of things to attach to, and shelter for all sorts of things to hide from larger things.

    The correct term for this is not a dump of accumulated plastic that needs to the napalmed. It is an environmentally sensitive area of especially biodiversity that needs to be protected.

  28. I might be in the minority here but I cannot see the point of bottled water when the water in the tap is so much cheaper and perfectly drinkable. I fail to see the point of bottling water in Fiji and then shipping it to the UK where it can be sold in Waitrose for a price that is higher per litre than petrol. In most first world countries you can get a litre of water for a fraction of a pence.

    The fact people are prepared to pay for this water simply reveals how stupid most people on this planet really are. If you are worried about “chemicals” in tap water buy a filter. If you need to take water with you while you exercise etc then buy a bottle and fill it from the tap, you will save a fortune.

    Of course if you are travelling outside the first world then bottled water is necessary as the local water may not be safe to drink.

    Ultimately though I agree with Tim, if people want to waste their money buying bottled water then fine, but I can think of a better use for my hard earned than that.

  29. So Much For Subtlety

    Offshore Observer – “I might be in the minority here but I cannot see the point of bottled water when the water in the tap is so much cheaper and perfectly drinkable. … Ultimately though I agree with Tim, if people want to waste their money buying bottled water then fine, but I can think of a better use for my hard earned than that.”

    I would be surprised if a single person here would disagree with a single word of that. Does anyone here think bottled water has a point? Does anyone think it is right to tell people they can’t spend their own hard earned cash as they like, even if it is on bottled water?

    Where I would object to the original article is I think TW is mixing up two issues. If someone wants to spend their money on pointless gestures designed to signify their class, good on them. But the waste does have a social cost. There *is* an externality. I loathe the sight of plastic in the environment with a passion. It takes a long time to break down and it does kill marine animals. Now I don’t believe all the Green hype about plastics and it is not the end of the world. But it is a shame and perhaps it would be a useful end of government policy to do something about it – catch them before they reach the water catchment, work on more biodegradable plastics, put a 5 p reward on each bottle that is turned in for recycling. That sort of thing.

  30. SMFS, I agree with you, incentives work. In fact recycling plastic is much cheaper and more environmentally efficient that recycling aluminium cans (and people do that) because the energy cost is lower.

  31. So Much For Subtlety

    Offshore Observer – “I agree with you, incentives work. In fact recycling plastic is much cheaper and more environmentally efficient that recycling aluminium cans (and people do that) because the energy cost is lower.”

    I think I have some warm clothes made from recycled plastics. There is a need for a conservative, sane, environmental politics. If only to save the environment from the sort of people who call themselves environmentalists. Usually TW is good on this. Usually I would think his suggestion would be a Pigou Tax or something.

    If recycling is not economically worth doing, there might be a sensible argument for the government doing something to make it more so.

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