Loonie tunes!

People should stop drinking orange juice because it contains as much sugar as Coca-Cola, the government’s leading adviser on obesity has warned, as she calls for a tax on all fruit juice.

Professor Susan Jebb said she had given up orange juice and urged others to “wean” themselves off it or dilute it.

Professor Jebb is in charge of the government’s responsibility deal, a series of voluntary pledges by industry aimed at tackling health problems such as obesity and alcohol abuse.

She warned that fruit juice should not be counted as one of your five-a-day portions of fruit as many juices because of its high sugar content.

Sigh.

It’s not five portions a day of fruit: it’s five a day of fruit and or vegetables. And the aim isn’t so that you eat things without sugar: it’s so that you eat things with lots of lovely vitamins and microcnutrients in them.

How much sugar such things also contain is irrelevant to the five a day advice: but obviously relevant in relation to your overall calorie budget.

That we’ve now got someone insisting that orange juice is bad for you because of the sugar is all the evidence we need that they’re being crackpots about the sugar.

Eating two juicy oranges is good for you. Blending two juicy oranges and drinking it is bad for you. See the stupidity here? Mashing a baked potato will kill you: eating a baked potato is good for you.

They’re nuts.

32 thoughts on “Loonie tunes!”

  1. No, they are not “nuts”. They are deliberately and maliciously increasing their personal power by exploiting the scientific ignorance of the public, the venality of politicians and the mendacity of the main-stream media.

    The whole “five a day” thing – it’s just invented. Plucked from thin air. Like the alcohol limits. Yet it is unquestioned “truth”. So much so that more mendacity can be introduced and contrasted against it.

  2. You enjoy drinking orange juice? The No-Fun Police can’t be having that. Healthy eating must be a penance, because how else do you get your daily intake of virtue?

  3. Going back to basics, five a day is a marketing gimmick, nothing more. There is no health benefits to the five a day mantra. A varied diet is all that is required.

  4. @”And the aim isn’t so that you eat things without sugar: it’s so that you eat things with lots of lovely vitamins and microcnutrients in them.”
    I think that the aim is that you get the fibre with them as well, which would explain why you should drink juice.
    BTW I am not agreeing with her, but explaining her position.

    @”Mashing a baked potato will kill you: eating a baked potato is good for you.”
    Sorry I can’t help here.

  5. Actually potato skins are a nutritionally important part of the potato – they contain a lot of the vitamins and fibre. Peel, boil and mash a spud and you’re missing a large amount of the nutritional value in it.

  6. As far as I understand this has to do with the effect of fructose. In fruit the fructose is combined with other elements which mitigate its fattening effects. When the fruit is converted to juice the fructose is separated out and its effects are enhanced. Now that’s what I heard on a science programme. Call me old fashioned but I believed it.

  7. @”Ian Hollingworth
    January 13, 2014 at 11:43 am

    As far as I understand this has to do with the effect of fructose. In fruit the fructose is combined with other elements which mitigate its fattening effects. When the fruit is converted to juice the fructose is separated out and its effects are enhanced. ”
    Not enhanced but it hits your body quicker and therefore causes more problems.
    I don’t know if this is true but I know that this is the theory.
    Also of course you can get a lot more sugar through drinking juice then eating fruit (unless you can eat 3 apples in a go).

  8. TW:“relevant in relation to your overall calorie budget”

    Aaargh! You borrow the wooden language of the enforcers.

  9. I don’t know if this is true but I know that this is the theory.

    Fibre diminishes blood sugar spikes and increases satiation. Juices and mashed potatoes are, thus, less liable to be health-promoting than their whole alternatives.

    But foods can be healthy or unhealthy depending on their context within a person’s diet. If a kid won’t eat an orange unless it is in a juice, a glass isn’t going to kill them.

  10. Eating two juicy oranges is good for you. Blending two juicy oranges and drinking it is bad for you. See the stupidity here?

    But juice isn’t the same as fruit, even juice with ‘bits’. IIRC this is about how the body processes the sugar – if there is fibre, sugar is processed differently from when there is no fibre.

    There is also the point that the juice from two oranges satiates less than eating two oranges. So you’d think you had a healthy drink but still feel hungry.

  11. Actually potato skins are a nutritionally important part of the potato – they contain a lot of the vitamins and fibre. Peel, boil and mash a spud and you’re missing a large amount of the nutritional value in it.

    My wife’s never peeled a potato in our nearly 30 years of marriage, not even for home made oven chips, for that reason. No idea where she got it from but its at least 30 year-old advice.

  12. one thing I don’t understand. Apparently eating five a day is good because of all the vitamins. But taking vitamin pills is ‘meaningless’ or ‘irrelevant’

    Why?

  13. @Martin Davies, banning all sugar is the aim of the nannying fussbuckets. Little do they realise how much sugar is in the natural foods that they would prefer the public to eat. Which is why the banning of what is seemed as natural, orange juice, will bite them in the arse as the public realise how stupid these new puritans are. These nannying fussbuckets are simple fascists that think living like the peasants of the middle ages is something to aspire to, just like Greenpeace and their anti fracking useful idiots.

  14. Their advice is sort of right but put in such a nannying manner that it automatically makes you want to ignore it.

    From what I can gather – commercial fruit juices have a high concentration of fructose. Much more than you’d get in just squeezing a few oranges, due to the processing of the juice. I wouldn’t be at all surprised if it is also often “vitmin enhanced”.
    Fructose doesn’t need insulin, it by-passes the pancreas and is absorbed through the stomach straight into the bloodstream. So it means that you have no natural method of preventing you from gorging on fructose, which is what makes you fat.
    So squeezing a few oranges for yourself is probably fine.

  15. How many fatties do we have from drinking fruit juice? Come on. No single food/drink is a cause.

    Everything is bad for you. Water can kill you (not just by drowning). It is just a question of quantity. The simplist advice, and all we need is, don’t overeat (we all, 99% at least, know what that is), vary your diet (no you don’t need to eat cockcroaches), cook more than use ready cooked and either masturbate yourself silly everyday or go for the occasional walk.

    No laws, no twattery…

  16. TW:“relevant in relation to your overall calorie budget”

    Aaargh! You borrow the wooden language of the enforcers.

    No, he’s using the language of the physicist who isn’t fat. If you don’t want to get fat, you have to balance calories in and calories out. If you’re unlucky enough that your brain doesn’t do that for you already, you have to stick to a calorie budget.

  17. Of course a lot of the micro-nutrients in potato skins or veggie leaves are poisons developed by the plants to prevent predation.

  18. So Much For Subtlety

    Kevin B – “Of course a lot of the micro-nutrients in potato skins or veggie leaves are poisons developed by the plants to prevent predation.”

    Indeed. If you chose to eat your potatos raw rather than processed in some way, mashed or roasted, you would probably come to a very bad end very quickly. A lot of the foods we eat are positively poisonous and need a lot of treatment before they are fit to consume. Even something like tea or coffee.

    Humans are not actually that good at extracting nutrients from food. Which is presumably why we invented cooking. A quick way to lose weight is to eat all your vegetables raw.

    They are, as TW says, frickin’ nuts. Although many nuts probably aren’t as bad for you.

  19. Why has no-one pointed out that “five-a-day” has *nothing* to do with nutrition and health but is a marketing slogan by Californian farmers & fruit-growers?
    There is no way that a normal guy can eat five portions of fruit and veg a day as part of a normal balanced diet unless he is burning up more than 4000 calories.
    Sure, a vegan can – but I don’t regard vitamin supplements as part of a *normal* balanced diet.

  20. So Much For Subtlety

    I wonder if I should tell this woman I had marmalade for breakfast? Perhaps not. Given the woeful state of the modern young British woman, she probably does not know what jam is made of.

    john77 – “There is no way that a normal guy can eat five portions of fruit and veg a day as part of a normal balanced diet unless he is burning up more than 4000 calories.”

    I like to think of my diet as normal and I get close. Of course I do not partake of vodka like so many here. But I do count the slice on lime in my gin and tonic.

  21. @ SMSF
    OK I don’t count the apple juice content of cider, but if I followed the advice of the puritans and switched to lemonade that would have virtually zero score. I just don’t see how you can fit five-a-day into a *balanced* diet of 2-3000 calories.

  22. @ SMSF
    A slice of lime is only about 0.1, just as the small tomatoes I eat with a sandwich only count as a fraction of a unit.

  23. Why has no-one pointed out that “five-a-day” has *nothing* to do with nutrition and health but is a marketing slogan by Californian farmers & fruit-growers?

    I think you’ll find SBML mentioned it above, John77.

    Roasting potatoes with the skins on is just pants. They have to absorb the meat juices and go all acrylamidy to get that to die for taste.

  24. @”john77
    January 14, 2014 at 12:58 am

    @ SMSF
    OK I don’t count the apple juice content of cider, but if I followed the advice of the puritans and switched to lemonade that would have virtually zero score. I just don’t see how you can fit five-a-day into a *balanced* diet of 2-3000 calories.

    Apples only have 95 calories, so five would have approximately 500 calories so I can’t see the problem.

  25. john77,

    There is no way that a normal guy can eat five portions of fruit and veg a day as part of a normal balanced diet unless he is burning up more than 4000 calories.

    It’s no problem at all unless you only like dates. Apples, oranges, strawberries, pears, pineapples, peaches, melon, grapes ~50 calories per portion. Veg tends to have fewer calories.

  26. So Much For Subtlety

    john77 – “A slice of lime is only about 0.1, just as the small tomatoes I eat with a sandwich only count as a fraction of a unit.”

    You must be using these new fangled metric units. Myself, I like to stick to the old fashioned Imperial units – where one portion is one portion. So a second gin and tonic counts for nearly half my daily requirement.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *