So Spitfires are jets now are they?

Another Daily Mail exclusive:

My Spitfire factory bachelor pad: Two-bedroom London flat in former fighter jet factory on sale for £925,000

Sheesh.

11 thoughts on “So Spitfires are jets now are they?”

  1. At least they managed to dredge up a photo of the correct airplane from their image library.

    That’s a much better success rate than they manage for anything to do with the animal kingdom.

  2. That’s interesting.
    So I could have made exactly the same claim for the workshop I used to rent. The company who used it during the war did machining for a major avionics manufacturer. Who did, indeed, supply avionics for Spitfires.
    Maybe we should have called ourselves “Fighter Furnishings”.
    (Comments about Jet Junk not appreciated)

  3. There was a nice caption in yesterday’s Tel. Under the photo of a portly gent on a bike, it said something like “Hugh Bonneville back in the saddle”.

  4. I don’t get the Bonneville stuff. Has he taken out a super injunction to protect his privacy from the toerags at the Sun etc? If so, good on him.

  5. Seems like someone is messing with his wiki page, too. They have him educated at Sherborne, the son of a nurse and a ‘tree surgeon’. I know fees were cheaper then but…

    (His dad was a surgeon.)

  6. So Much For Subtlety

    If I could quibble, the factory remained a factory until 1984 or so. Only then was it turned into flats.

    So the question is what was made there betweeen 1948 (when the Spitfire ceased production) and 1984?

    Yes, they are ignorant tossers. But it is possible that the factory produced parts for Spitfires and, later on, jets. In fact it would have been a little hard not to.

  7. @ SMFS
    Well maybe
    “fighter jet”
    And they are still manufacturing propeller-driven planes
    Secondly – the factory *never* made Spitfires- just the tyres.
    Granted, if they were the best makers of tyres they probably did make tyres for fighter jets as well, but I thought that Fort Dunlop made most of the top-quality tyres for RAF planes in the ’50s. ’60s and ’70s, with Avon as their principal competitor.

  8. So Much For Subtlety

    john77 – “And they are still manufacturing propeller-driven planes”

    Who is they? Palmer?

    “Secondly – the factory *never* made Spitfires- just the tyres.”

    I did say parts. They did not. As I said, they are ignorant tossers.

    “Granted, if they were the best makers of tyres they probably did make tyres for fighter jets as well, but I thought that Fort Dunlop made most of the top-quality tyres for RAF planes in the ’50s. ’60s and ’70s, with Avon as their principal competitor.”

    I have just had a quick check to see if I can find out if they did make tyres for any jets. But apart from learning there are websites for buying and selling De Havilland Vampire parts, no luck. Palmer seems to have used this London site for aeronautical research and development. Whatever that means.

    1984? Bugger all of the British airplane companies made it that long. Most closing in the Sixties with a few hanging on to the 1977 Nationalisation. Hawker Siddeley for instance. So perhaps they made tyres for them until the rationalisations of the 1980s when the aerospace stuff was sort of forgotten?

  9. So Much For Subtlety

    john77 – “Granted, if they were the best makers of tyres they probably did make tyres for fighter jets as well, but I thought that Fort Dunlop made most of the top-quality tyres for RAF planes in the ’50s. ’60s and ’70s, with Avon as their principal competitor.”

    The Avro Vulcan used Dunlop tyres. But Palmer is listed as a parts supplier. The undercarriage perhaps?

    The timing might be about right too. The Vulcan was retired around 1984. 1982 I think. It might take them a year or two to wind down and find a purchaser. Actually I have just checked. The Vulcans were retired in 1984.

    Not, I admit, a fighter though.

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