About NHS Wales

Leading doctors have raised fears that high numbers of patients are dying while waiting for heart surgery in Wales.

The Royal College of Surgeons wrote to healthcare inspectors last year warning of “grave concerns” that too many people were dying in the south of the country because of long waits for heart surgery.

The letter, seen by The Daily Telegraph, calls for swift action to tackle “unacceptably high mortality” levels and highlights more than 150 cases in which patients died waiting for life-saving treatment.

Last night the college said it remains concerned, and was waiting for the findings of two NHS working parties in Wales which are currently examining the issue.

It’s worth noting that NHS Wales has not become marketised in the manner that NHS England has been. Lucky that, eh, otherwise people would be dying as companies competed for profit rather than cooperate in the pursuit of the patients’ best interests.

12 thoughts on “About NHS Wales”

  1. Its unfortunate then that ordinary people’s only experience with the private sector is via the vets which Bloke in Spain eloquently confirms below over-charge by x10 .It is no wonder people fight shy of private medicine for themselves . I do have friends who are British millionaires (ie their houses have been State sponsored to appreciate by this most of this amount); they cannot afford BUPA .The thing about state services are they are value for money and being funded out of taxation the rich bastards pay more than you do (except in respect of house/land values which are untaxed being the means by which the ruling class stays in power by bribery).

  2. also that, like the failing education system, since devolution it has been run exclusively Labour who are putting in a 6% NHS Wales funding cut this year

  3. Bollocks.

    Many companies offer private health care for ALL of their employees. The company I used to work for has nearly 100,000 employees. A larger proportion of them will be on relatively low wages (£20k pa). So I’d be more than happy to call them “ordinary” *.

    I know many colleagues who used the private health insurance when the NHS were quoting waiting times of months (even years) just to get an appointment. Every one of them came back singing the praises of the private health care they received.

    * can you please define what you mean by “ordinary”? Not part of the eeeeevil 1%? Or the moderately less eeeevil top 2.5%? Or top 9.6%? At what arbitrary point do you define people as no longer being “ordinary”?

  4. Curiously, DBC, I reach the opposite conclusion to you. The reason vets get away with charging extortionate prices is because Brits have no inclination to shop around for medical care for their animals. They’ve no habit of doing it for themselves.
    People or animals, medical care’s not some sort of mystical rite. it’s simply a service industry like car repair. Except the Brit’s have got themselves in the same situation as with dealer franchises. Obliged to pay £200 for a service costs the dealer £40 parts & labour, because of the warranty conditions.

  5. So Much for Subtlety

    It’s worth noting that NHS Wales has not become marketised in the manner that NHS England has been.

    More importantly, it has remained politicised. So these issues become ones of national politics – debated in Parliament. The solution involves the State getting involved. Which in turn depends on media campaigns. Which means that efforts to improve are intermittent.

    Compare this with the day-to-day pressure applied by the free market. If these hospitals had a reputation on which they lived or died, so to speak, they would struggle each and every day to improve. Not just get the usual excuses together to fob off the twice-a-decade government inquiry.

  6. Once Scotland has taken itself off our welfare books I think we should fence off Wales and tell them to do their own thing but not on our taxes. As a socialist paradise they will be comparing themselves with Venezuela.

  7. So Much for Subtlety

    Ljh – “Once Scotland has taken itself off our welfare books I think we should fence off Wales and tell them to do their own thing but not on our taxes.”

    As long as we are suitable contrite about that whole Anglo-Saxon invasion thing. Which we can show we mean by offering some sort of amends. I suggest giving them the West Midlands back. The fence can run through the Cotswalds.

    Perhaps some of the North-West too. We can keep Cumbria and perhaps Preston. They can have the rest.

    “As a socialist paradise they will be comparing themselves with Venezuela.”

    Given the demographics of modern Britain, we should all be so lucky to turn out as well as Venezuela.

  8. Does DBC subscribe to the worldview that healthcare provision is a binary choice between the NHS or some disaster-pr0n fansasy version of the US system?

    You know, the worldview that ignores…. the rest of Europe not to mention most of the rest of the civilised world.

  9. This relies on the false premise that people don’t die on waiting lists in England.

    Or anywhere else.

    Death is a key method of healthcare rationing the world over.

  10. SMFS,

    Compare this with the day-to-day pressure applied by the free market. If these hospitals had a reputation on which they lived or died, so to speak, they would struggle each and every day to improve.

    The problem is that the people running the hospitals have no stake in their success. The people running North Staffs didn’t put their own money, or investors money in, they’ll walk away with nice pensions. A company like P&G has to make sure that its washing powders don’t hurt people. Not because of the law or their own sense of being good to people, both of which they may like to do, but because it will personally hurt them when customers start buying different washing powder.

  11. So Much for Subtlety

    The Stigler – “The problem is that the people running the hospitals have no stake in their success. The people running North Staffs didn’t put their own money, or investors money in, they’ll walk away with nice pensions.”

    But I bet they had perfect anti-discrimination and diversity policies. After all that matters to the bureaucracy. Healing the sick does not. People respond to incentives. Give the politicians control and the incentives will be political. Give the market control and the incentives will be pleasing the customer.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *