Damn right too

RSPCA risks losing power to prosecute
Independent reviewer considers stripping charity of its right to prosecute following string of controversial court cases

Quite why they ever had prosecution tights I’m not sure.

Campaigners have long complained that the RSPCA can both investigate and prosecute cases, while also campaigning to raise money.

They have suggested that because the charity often levies large costs in the cases it wins, some people plead guilty because they fear contesting a charge and losing.

The process is the punishment…..

9 thoughts on “Damn right too”

  1. Mmmmmm prosecution tights, sounds hellish kinky, which is probably why they had them. I’ve always suspected that charity workers who dress in uniform have repressed sexuality as well as other mental health issues.

  2. How does the charity get to levy costs? Surely, even in a private prosecution, that’s the job of the judge or court?

  3. I take it what they are talking about is an internal matter – that the RSPCA could decide to stop making private prosecutions.

    Or does the RSPCA have better prosecution tights than the rest of us?

  4. Or does the RSPCA have better prosecution tights than the rest of us?

    Slightly. Everyone has the right to take out a private prosecution but you need permission (from the Attorney General iirc.) The RSPCA are treated as having standing permission.

  5. Yeah SE
    That probably answers the costs angle as well. Be like local authorities. The action & the costs are just a rubber stamped decision. It must be correct or they wouldn’t have asked.

  6. Perhaps things should move in the opposite direction – enhanced prosecution tights for every special interest group! EDL to prosecute honour killings, WWF for environmental pollution, Tax Justice Network for tax evasion…

  7. So Much For Subtlety

    Gareth – “Perhaps things should move in the opposite direction – enhanced prosecution tights for every special interest group! EDL to prosecute honour killings, WWF for environmental pollution, Tax Justice Network for tax evasion…”

    All prosecution used to be private prosecutions. I am not sure that we have done well out of that change.

    But this is good news. On the whole. If only they would strip them of their state funding and charitable status too. Every now and then someone says something sane that makes you feel better about the world. I like this man for instance:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2549885/Dry-January-did-actually-HARM-health-Expert-claims-having-regular-tipple-better-abstinence.html

    Professor Charles Bamforth, of the University of California, Davis, said: ‘Many people don’t realise that drinking in moderation has significant health benefits and that moderate drinkers have a longer life expectancy than non–drinkers.
    ‘Regular moderate intake of alcohol is good for the heart and blood circulation.’
    The author of Beer, Health and Nutrition said drinking to excess can cause serious problems, but added: ‘The key is a little and often.
    ‘You are seriously mistaken if you think that having a month without drinking will protect you from the effects of excessive drinking for the rest of the year.
    ‘The best advice is to drink moderately throughout the year.’

    It is bizarre when the best health advice you are likely to get comes from the Daily Mail.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *