My word hasn’t Marxism become embedded

Public schoolchildren must “get out of their towers” and mix with pupils from state school backgrounds by volunteering, a minister has said.

Nick Hurd, the minister for civil society, warned that private school children must not cut themselves off from the rest of the country by “sitting in silos” and must “get involved in social action”.

When we have a liberal, nay even a self professed democrat, wibbling on about socially appropriate backgrounds.

Get with it Nick laddie: who the kiddies play with is fuck all to do with a government minister. That’s one of the meanings of the word “liberal”.

18 thoughts on “My word hasn’t Marxism become embedded”

  1. Don’t worry, Tim. Police and ambulance services have been alerted that our little darlings have gone to play Lady Bountiful to those dreadful oiks on the estate.

  2. Christie,

    Ah, I got away from any of that by being in the CCF Band.

    However, not only did we mix with people from “state school backgrounds” because we had a significant fraction of scholarship pupils we also, not being boarders, mixed with them on the buses too and from school.

    And in the quizzes, chess and sports leagues (albeit not, being Jocks, in rugby or cricket. Apart from QV, they were almost entirely independent school practices.)

    I actually remember my parents (mother, probably) forgetting to pick us up after a chess league match at one of the high schools in one of the even-more-deprived areas of Dundee. Whitfield (now Braeview Academy) and having to be protected (being obvious in my ‘posh school uniform) by the Whitfield chess team from the gangs of feral youths that were trashing the school grounds now it was out of hours.

  3. As someone who attended a private school in the centre of a town that had several comprehensives in close proximity, I can confirm that much ‘involvement in social action’ took place, mostly of a physical nature.

  4. Fuck me, that takes the biscuit.

    Son of Dougls Hurd. That’ll be Lord Hurd of Westwell to you, sonny.

    Sunningdale and Eton.

    Oxford and the Bullingdon Club.

    And fuck me one last time, the FOURTH GENERATION of Tory MPs from this lot.

    He did spread himself around a bit, didn’t he. But not vertically through the social strata, oh no, rather, in the big septic pond floating on top of it.

  5. In Nick Hurd’s defence … I once heard an Ivy League professional admit to his embarrassment at being unable to engage in small talk with the lad who’d come to fix his dishwasher. Exposure to others at such an early age should, at the very least, enable public school graduates to converse with the hired help.

  6. When you have a ‘Minister for Civil Society’ you know you either no longer have a ‘Civil Society’ or it is nearly fucked.

  7. “I once heard an Ivy League professional admit to his embarrassment at being unable to engage in small talk with the lad who’d come to fix his dishwasher.”

    I presume you just ask about the footie, call him “mate” and try not to whince noticeably when he asks for milk in his cup of lapsing souchong.

  8. Like Jim, I went to a private school. I had to take public transport every day and was exposed to a wide range of social interactions from the age of 11.

    Some of my mixing with kids from a state school background involved me being spat on, threatened with knives, and being beaten up by a gang of older boys who had lain in wait for that very purpose. My posh school uniform had inflamed them to mete out some social justice. It was quite an education.

    The school also encouraged pupils to take part in charitable activities so I fed the homeless, helped disabled kids on a sink estate, gave some of my toys to a children’s home, raised money for Africa, and sang carols in a choir to collect donations for the poor. I’m not some kind of saint, I did less volunteer work than many pupils.

    Based on my experiences, I believe public schools do more for the wider community than state schools do, and privately educated children interact with people from a wider variety of social backgrounds than do their comprehensive school counterparts.

    Hectoring private schools, blaming them for various social ills and demanding they do more to suit the agenda of the Left has become our alternative national sport. It doesn’t matter what public schools do though, the Left won’t be happy till they’re all closed down. Their very existence is a rebuke to our failing state sector.

  9. When I was at school I was in the CCF, so I mixed quite a lot with people from state school backgrounds. I spent every thursday and the occasional weekend being told what to do, rather loudly and bluntly, by people from state school backgrounds. As they were squaddies, they took a particular delight in getting some floppy-haired public schoolboys to order about but guess what? After a while we got on quite well. And once we’d passed 18 we went out on the piss with them.

    Of course, being squaddies, they were the wrong kind of ‘people from state school backgrounds.’ What with not being guardian-approved wet-liberals or socialists on benefits.

    We did also interact with some people from the local state school when a group of them surrounded a kid in the first year and beat him so badly he had to have his jaw re-wired. He’d made the awful, snobbish, unforgivable mistake of saying ‘excuse me’, you see, when they blocked his path. His first term in, he didn’t know not to take the shortcut through the cemetery.

    I’m pleased to say that after that some members of the First XV went down to the cemetery and interacted the shit out of them.

  10. I presume you just ask about the footie, call him “mate” and try not to whince noticeably when he asks for milk in his cup of lapsing souchong.

    The first time I had to get a glazier out he was a bit put out that the only tea I could offer him was Earl Grey. So when the plumber came I apologised in advance that there was only Earl Grey; he asked “Twinings or Liptons?”

    Turns out plumbers in west london are quite middle class.

  11. ‘In Nick Hurd’s defence … I once heard an Ivy League professional admit to his embarrassment at being unable to engage in small talk with the lad who’d come to fix his dishwasher. ‘

    This has nothing to do with where you went to school, and more about being somewhere on the spectrum.

    Mind you, why would you want to chat to him? Get the dishwasher fixed, here’s your wedge, thanks a million, now fuck off.

  12. The most worrying thing about this is that we have something called a minister for civil society. What does he do all day to justify a ministerial salary?

  13. Bloke in Costa Rica

    I don’t know how many ministers of state we actually need but I can be pretty sure that Hurd’s position is thoroughly superfluous. I reckon about five Cabinet ministers should be able to handle all the things that are the legitimate responsibility of government and the rest can fuck off to the backbenches.

    I was a scholarship boy at public school. There would have been precious little point in going there if I were forced to mingle with hoi polloi. It was my chance of escaping them.

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