A political claim that I’m sure isn’t true

‘Ed Miliband Is A Different Sort Of Politician’

No, that doesn’t quite ring true really. I’m sure we’ve had gormless idiots and failures trying to be politicians before.

35 thoughts on “A political claim that I’m sure isn’t true”

  1. She may not have a degree for Oxbridge or been a SPaD, spending your twenties working for charities and obviously party hacking enough to land a safe seat at 30 means you are far from normal.

    I know two former Uni, undergrad and Masters, classmates who haven’t been SpAds but work for charities, not phoning people to donate but policy areas, they are in their 20s and have landed possible winnable seats for Labour and they are as far as normal as you can get.

    Frankly, anyone under 35, maybe 40, who becomes an MP is highly likely to be odd and abnormal.

    Blummin hacks

  2. So Much for Subtlety

    Mind you, Miliband is the first one who looks and acts like he walked off the set for Wallace and Grommit.

    We are uniquely placed in having so many useless gits in office right now. It is hard to think of a time when the political class was worse. I suggest we admit the Reform Act was a terrible mistake, hand power over to the Duke of Devonshire and nine of his chums, and give up in shame.

  3. “I felt from the moment [Ed] made his maiden speech in 2005, that he was a different sort of politician, that he was more thoughtful than many of the other politicians that we heard from during that era, and that he could sense that things outside of parliament were changing – and the political machine wasn’t changing quickly enough.”

    I really don’t know how people can say this type of thing and not be lying or deeply deluded. Miliband is the absolute epitome of a modern, machine politician – his ‘thoughtful’ness is an unappealing blend of worn out old catchphrases, 90s-ish middle ground pish and some 70s ‘tax the rich until…’ nonsense. He’s only got elected leader because of the union machine decided he was the one. FFS; Miliband and the laborites spending the last week claiming that powerful and suspiciously unnamed forces are set against Milibandism. Look in the mirror fucknuts! It’s you. You’re the establishment. But apparently you’re too fucking dozy to see it. Twats. Utter twats.

    “We have a lot more people in the PLP [Parliamentary Labour Party] who are working-class, who are fantastic advocates, who have lived those struggles. They can act as really important role models. People like Ian Mearns, the MP for Gateshead.”

    Get one of those plebby commoners in here! Does it wear a flat-cap? That’d be jolly working class if it did.

  4. It’s not just that the fuckers have never had a proper job, they usually come from families where neither parent has had a proper job either. So experience and “nurture” are equally distorting; “nature” is often none too impressive either.

    And I expect Mr Moribund to be the next PM. Oh joy!

  5. It’s mere narrative-spam. Flood the discourse with enough bollocks like this and eventually people might believe it. Polly has written countless articles like this bigging up new Labour leaders, they always say the same things.

  6. Rob

    Owen Jones is as guilty as Polly but at least he has been back-pedalling furiously lately. Just shows how diasastrous the ‘pede is.

  7. Nandy is definitely different to most of the other MPs in the Westminster village.

    Born and raised in Manchester, with an accent to show for it, she wasn’t a special adviser to a minister or shadow minister, and doesn’t have a degree from Oxbridge. The daughter of an Indian dad and English mum, she graduated from Newcastle University, did a master’s at Birkbeck in London and worked for the homelessness charity Centrepoint and the kids’ charity The Children’s Society before being elected to the rock-solid Labour seat of Wigan in 2010 – at the age of just 30

    “Definitely different”?

    No she’s not.

    It’s the idea that “more government” is going to make things better…………how does that – ever work?

    All-in-all though, it’s hard to dislike someone like Nandy. I just wonder, has she spent too much time working in the wrong type of job? Truly do institutions – institutionalize people. Plus, more Socialism despite what she believes and everyone in her neck of the woods will tell her – is not the answer. Why do they persist, is it some form of affliction?

    On Miliband, why can’t they see it?

    He is a barely reconstructed Communist, for him: the state is, will and must control everything, every facet of life in Britain. Furthermore, this is why he buys into ‘le grand projet’ so vehemently – Brussels and its micromanagement authoritarianism – is Miliband’s wet dream politics…….. and his yapping curs.

  8. “And I expect Mr Moribund to be the next PM. Oh joy!”

    I was of that opinion until recently. But now I think he’s screwed. Scotland, which used to be a Labour rotten borough, has now rotted so much its disintegrated. There is no purpose for Labour in Scotland now. Want to vote for a Socialist Scotland? Vote SNP. Why vote Labour? They’ll just be off in Westminster kowtowing to the City and all the evil capitalist scum.

    Thats 35 Labour MPs with P45s right there. Add in the Greens nipping at his left wing flanks, and UKIP suddenly deciding it doesn’t want to be a right wing libertarian party, but an anti-immigration ‘up the working man, fags and booze’ type party, and suddenly Millipede doesn’t look so good.

    My money would now be on (if I was a betting man, which I’m not) the Tories being largest party, and possibly doing a deal with (of all people) the SNP on a supply and demand basis and basically running England and Wales as a majority govt, leaving the SNP to run Scotland as a wholly owned but totally managerially independent subsidiary.

  9. @ Jim — Yes, I’d broadly agree, though I think/fear UKIP could snuffle (is that a word? it is now) up enough ex-tory votes to let labour limp over the line.

    Either way, I’m hoping a)Cameron and his chums manage not to balls things up too badly b) Miliband continues being Ed Miliband.

    How does Supply and Demand work then? THat’s the one where the other party agrees to support the Queens speech bill and budgets in return for a few policy concessions? Wouldn’t that mean a gov could potentially fall the first time they lose a vote?

  10. How does Supply and Demand work then?

    I think that what was meant was confidence and supply which is a notch below coalition whereby the minor party supports the major party in confidence votes and votes with it on an ad hoc basis on legislation of which it approves.

  11. re: Sword_of_truth

    “Time to end the disastrous democratic experiment”

    As the ex – Goldman Sachs guy who now works for the EU said – we are moving into a post democratic age,

    Ending democracy is precisely the point of the EU.

  12. Yes Confidence and Supply basis, my bad.

    In fact thinking about it, if the SNP got 45 MPs out of the 59 Scottish constituencies, and agreed not to vote on anything south of the border, and support Cameron in any confidence votes, then the Tories would only need 303 MPs to have a majority of the rest. Offer the Nats whatever they want on the devolution front, on the basis the more power you give them to tax and spend the more likely they are to f*ck it up, in return for coming south for a confidence vote if there ever was one, job done.

  13. SMFS

    Masterful as always – you are absolutely correct. I cannot think of any period in history since the Civil War when the political class was as contemptible as it is now.

    ‘We are uniquely placed in having so many useless gits in office right now. It is hard to think of a time when the political class was worse. I suggest we admit the Reform Act was a terrible mistake, hand power over to the Duke of Devonshire and nine of his chums, and give up in shame.’

    Be careful, though, this will be seized upon by Murphy and his chums as ‘evidence of anti-democratic intent’ (as opposed to anonymous postal ballots, constituency gerrymandering and paying people in the non-productive public sector to vote for you, all of which are the basis of ‘civil society’)

  14. I’m not so sure about the “never had a proper job” criticism. Yes, it’s true of course but many former British Prime Ministers and senior politicians fall into the same bracket.

    What sets the modern chumps apart is their complete and utter divorce from actual real people. They live by a pallid internationalism wrapped around a core of bonkers identity politics. They view actual, real people and their non-PC, embarrassingly UK-centric views with alarm and contempt. On the few occasions they venture outside the secure echo chamber without wearing protective gear they perish horribly.

    How much of this is voluntary and how much is fear of reprisals for daring to leave their herd I don’t know.

  15. So the grand-daughter of Frank, Lord Byers who was educated at Westminster school and Christ Church, Oxford has a Manchester accent. Frank Byers was rich enough to go into Parliament when you needed a private income or TUC support because expenses were roughly double the salary; in later life he had four more income streams, from the House of Lords, from his business, from being a non-executive director of RTZ and from being a broadcaster I think one may deduce that the reason she did not go to Oxbridge was that she wasn’t bright enough.
    And Mehdi Hassan thinks that the time between getting a second degree at one of the lesser colleges in London University after first degree at a reasonable second class university and the age of 30 is “nearly a decade”. We never really thought that he could do arithmetic, did we?

  16. bloke (not) in spain

    “I’m not so sure about the “never had a proper job” criticism. Yes, it’s true of course but many former British Prime Ministers and senior politicians fall into the same bracket.”

    What sets the modern chumps apart is that they really do truly believe they’re real people who’ve had real jobs. At least the old timers knew & accepted they weren’t of the ‘ordinary working man’ & were willing to listen, occasionally. This lot just presumes everyone thinks, or should think, like they do.

  17. I’ve calmed down now. So whereas it used to be MPs whom I had known (e.g. Rifkind, Brown, Cook, and others), now it’s a case of the children. Thank God I never knew any Benns: there would be no keeping up with them.

  18. “many former British Prime Ministers and senior politicians fall into the same bracket”: aye, but many of them had run a business, or a regiment, or an estate, or a professional practice, or a trade union. All of those are better educations into the ways of mankind than the sort of stuff Mr Moribund has concerned himself with.

  19. Actually, I think Miliband is a new type of Labour politician, at least. He’s inherited his position, wealth, and influence thanks to daddy’s position as Labour royalty. Benn and his ilk certainly relied on inherited privilege, but it was general privilege; Miliband is where he is thanks solely to Labour-related privileges.

  20. “Benn and his ilk certainly relied on inherited privilege, but it was general privilege; Miliband is where he is thanks solely to Labour-related privileges.” WKPD:

    “[Tony] Benn’s father William Wedgwood Benn was a Liberal Member of Parliament from 1906 who crossed the floor to the Labour Party in 1928 and was appointed Secretary of State for India by Ramsay MacDonald in 1929, a position he held until 1931. William Benn was elevated to the House of Lords with the title of Viscount Stansgate in 1942 – the new wartime coalition government was short of working Labour peers in the upper house. From 1945-46, William Benn was the Secretary of State for Air in the first majority Labour Government.”

    So I’d say that Wedgie Benn did benefit from specifically Labour privilege.

  21. @ Rob
    Would you like to name one, just one, of the “many former PMs” who never had a proper job since Melbourne? I cannot remember any of them.

  22. Her dad was a commie, by the way. So she’s rather like Moribund herself.

    Shen I google him I find “Some results may have been removed under data protection law in Europe.” What can it portend?

  23. Dearieme,

    from Google:

    “When you search for a name, you may see a notice that says that results may have been modified in accordance with data protection law in Europe. We’re showing this notice in Europe when a user searches for most names, not just pages that have been affected by a removal.”

    So quite possibly absolutely nothing.

  24. The change for me came when the war time generation faded out of politics. Up to the end of the Thatcher years senior politicians had either lived through the war years, served in the Forces, or did National Service, which provided a heavy dose of reality. Its the post-war generation as espoused by Tony Blair’s career that are the sad disappointment.

  25. ” I suggest we admit the Reform Act was a terrible mistake, hand power over to the Duke of Devonshire and nine of his chums, and give up in shame.”

    Couldn’t be worse than the current situation

  26. I know one scion of an Old Labour family who was asked to be a parliamentary candidate because of the (very famous) family name.

    No political skills, experience or interest. He was contacted by old friends of the family – the whole thing was completely stitched up and ready to go. Apparently he would simply be parachuted into a former mining area. 100% certain to be elected…. No campaigning required.

    He told them to get knotted in a stream-of-consciousness-of-all-the-swear-words email that was awesome in its Swiftian fury.

    Come to think of it, maybe he should have done it. He had absolutely no interest in doing what other people told him to do……..

  27. “I’m not sure Churchill’s four years in the Cavalry and a bit of jobbing journalism counts as “a proper job”? Albeit, he did a bit more Army time before becoming PM.”

    His expertise in foreign policy was acquired by having attended pretty much all the wars at the end of the 19th cent. Think of his early career as hands-on research.

    His book on Afghanistan is still a must read for anyone tempted to do anything in the area.

    I would submit that sending the current crop of callow would-be MPs to sit in a trench in Northern Iraq would rapidly educate them.

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