Don’t be a twat Moore

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay’s bombed-out dystopia is all too familiar: it could be Syria, Gaza or Iraq

That the Jennifer Lawrence-starring films are such big box office means someone is paying attention to what teenage girls like – and it isn’t pretty

The Hunger Games isn’t about a dystopic vision in which there’s no effective government. It’s about one in which there’s an all too effective, and malevolent, government. You know, the socialist end of the spectrum, not the libertarian?

17 thoughts on “Don’t be a twat Moore”

  1. In what way can a dictatorship or a theocracy (the 2 competing models controlling most of Syria) be said to be libertarian?

  2. Most of the Left are so colossally ignorant they consider ‘Libertarianism’ to be some extreme right-wing ideology akin to Fascism.

  3. The Hunger Games is a silly conception of how a society could run. Its like North Korea, but somehow a large Minority(20-30%) of the population are incredibly rich somehow and markets dont exist.

    This isnt at all plausible.

    While this is a ‘young adult’ piece of Science Fiction (doesnt deserve the serious SF tag), and perhaps should be given a break, it falls into a long line of entertaining but ridiculous sci fi works that are just the authors limited prejudices played out in fiction.

  4. Most of these dystopias are economically illiterate. The favourite one consists of a society run by “the coporations” and an impoverished citizenry and no explanation of who buys the corporations’ products.

  5. bloke (not) in spain

    @Rob Harries
    Depends on what you think SF (speculative fiction) is supposed to be doing. The formula, at its best, takes two or three strands of the contemporary world & extrapolates them to see where they go. The Hunger Games does that with its stratified society, vicious entertainment industry & totalitarian government. A re-run of the Roman Empire for modern times & not that far from where we could be headed.
    You can create entire internally self-consistent alternative worlds in SF. Game of Thrones is an example. But they’re extremely difficult & can be extremely hard work for the consumer,who has to “live” in the world as much as the characters to understand it.
    HG’s certainly a far cry from standard Hollywood SciFi which usually just adds space ships to whatever screenplay they’ve had hanging around.

  6. Rob Harries – well in North Korea there’s a minority of people much richer than the majority of grindingly poor folk. Even they are still poor compared to the developed world obviously. But not so poor compared to the world’s least developed countries. And rich beyond the wildest dreams in many ways, not least technological wizardry, compared to the aspirations of a hundred years ago. So by setting a work of fiction far enough into the future you can probably make any economic system, no matter how dire, look like it delivers for the folk at the top.

  7. @”and rich beyond the wildest dreams in many ways, not least technological wizardry, compared to the aspirations of a hundred years ago. ”
    but they buy things made by free market economies whilst the hunger games are a closed society.

  8. I wonder if Ms Moore has actually read The Hunger Games? If not then she might be surprised that it paints a remarkably sophisticated (certainly more so than our State TV has ever managed) view of the ‘rebels’. They are organised by a pretty loathsome lot who are prepared to do anything to defeat the powers that be (I won’t spoil the end reveal). They are evil.

    But, as Rob says above, the economics of the world building are the usual dystopian fluff. i.e. the capital’s millions – colossally rich, technologically sophisticated (flying cars, force field holograms the size of a city) – have energy needs that are supported entirely by the output of one small Kentucky coal mine that has a population of about 10,000.

  9. Tim seems to be remarkably well informed about a film in which pretty teenage girls feature prominently. To be clear, nothing wrong in that – ’tis a genre that rather interests me too.

    Isn’t HG similar to / a copy of a better Japanese book?

  10. bloke (not) in spain

    @S-R
    To be fair to HG, Area 12 (isn’t it?) is portrayed as only a portion of the underclass society.
    From an economic point of view, the HG world isn’t too impossible. A rich strata of highly productive ( for reasons of education, genetic enhancement, technological advantage…choose your reason) citizens who can produce/consume in an almost closed loop. A lower strata, without the benefits enjoyed by the upper, Much lower marginal productivity feeding the few requirements of the upper strata & benefiting little from its wealth. it’s not that far from where we’re currently headed.

  11. the memorable description of the first Hunger Games film was “Battle Royale with cheese”. While the films share elements, this is not an entirely fair description. As a decidedly non-teenage non-girl, I rather enjoyed it.

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