Timmy elsewhere

At the ASI.

Given British history we’d rather expect the children of people with degrees to make more than the children of those without degrees.

13 thoughts on “Timmy elsewhere”

  1. So Much for Subtlety

    So what we’re seeing is that the children of the rich and or bright have higher incomes than the children of the not rich and not bright. And put that way it’s not really all that surprising, is it? Whether we want it to be this way is entirely another matter, but it’s not actually surprising.

    Well traditionally we preferred the children of the rich and stupid to have higher incomes. Princess Diana is a good example. Everyone loved her.

    I am not sure that the children of the rich and smart being so rich is a good idea. I actually find the upper class less annoying than my own class. But perhaps that is because they are harmless by being so powerless?

    Anyway, it is interesting to see the Black Slate dying so hard. It is weird that people who make such a fetish of belief in Darwinism as a marker of the “Bright” community refuse so stubbornly to actually accept anything it says.

  2. Well traditionally we preferred the children of the rich and stupid to have higher incomes. Princess Diana is a good example. Everyone loved her.

    I thought it was the poor and stupid who especially loved her.

  3. bloke (not) in spain

    Is there any particular correlation between being bright & having a university education? If there is, it’s quite hard to discern. Having the talent to win a place at university & gain a degree may be a talent, but does it transfer elsewhere? Even for those now in their 40s & 50s uni was an option for those couldn’t expect to get a decent job on their own merits.
    Because even then & much more now, the university educated had set up camp at the gateway to opportunity to ensure better chances for people like them to pass through.
    I’ve long reached the conclusion this is the main reason the country continues to be increasingly dysfunctional & headed down the toilet..

  4. I accept your premise in the most generalist of ways but am not so sure reality entirely bears this out. When I left school (unceremoniously expelled from Crap Street Secondary Modern at 15) only 7pct or so of kids made it to university, hence we are starting from a very low base. Whilst I never got around to producing offspring, I do have a fair number of nephews and a niece. Unlike any of their parents most went to university, studying maths, physics, medicine, engineering and business. Their starting salaries, at least as far as my generation are concerned, were eye-watering; now they bestride the globe. If I do agree with you it is in noting those who attended private schools seem to have benefited from enhanced networking opportunities, rising further and faster. Privilege and ambition aside, however, you can’t beat talent and hard work – although having parents that point you in the right direction (be they graduates or not) certainly helps. Their children (the grandchildren) are destined to rise even further, which I suppose paradoxically confirms your supposition.

  5. @ b(n)is
    In my young days when kids who could do sums but weren’t actually all that bright got sent off to be accountants,then *yes* there *was* a correlation between being bright and getting an university education. *Grammar Schools* – shout it from the rooftops! Also Public Schools gave scholarships – in my year not one boy who paid full fees went to Oxford or Cambridge.
    I have no idea what it was like for those now in their 40s or 50s but in my day everyone had to get a job on their own merits (even if, in Gerald Grosvenor’s case, it was unpaid) .

  6. bloke (not) in spain

    @john77
    I’d say I was probably in the last cohort, didn’t find the absence of a university education an impedance. I know, in my own case, my school academic achievement slope would have provided an easy university place had I stayed on. But my career choice mitigated in favour of leaving school at the earliest opportunity. It would simply been a complete waste of five years. If I’d opted to change employer, at that point, I’d have strolled into any position over the backs of as many Oxbridge graduates as you could lay down in a row.
    But, then, hardly any of my prospective employers would have been graduates themselves. Didn’t have much use or respect for them, either.
    Somewhere along the line the grads must have worked their way in though. Now you can’t get near the City without being one of them. Even to stuff rolls at Subway. The clever guys who brought us 2008.

  7. The clever guys who brought us 2008 were those who lied and took commissions on mortgages to “disadvantaged” groups in California, Ciolorado and a few other US states where individuals could just default on mortgages and walk away.
    Since when did you need an Oxbridge degree to become a dishonest US estate agent?
    “my school academic achievement slope would have provided an easy university place had I stayed on. But my career choice mitigated in favour of leaving school at the earliest opportunity. It would simply been a complete waste of five years.” Slightly puzzling – if you were that bright why five years? Gordon Brown apparently went to Edinburgh at 16 and, based on my ‘A’ level results, I could have gone to London University at 16.

  8. curiously not having degree was no impediment to me until I hit my 40s. Then I found myself up against lots of degreed applicants and HR departments using education as a sieve.

  9. I forgot to say, we edumacationalists have a saying: the only provable link between money and education is that rich people like to buy a good education for their children.

  10. R le J… Speaking as an employer – and rightly or wrongly – a perception has grown that dictates honours graduates are now the base line, in much the same way many years ago it was five O-levels. Conversely as an employee I can get away with having zilch as I’ve a proven track record (but am accordingly expected to deliver). Little sister works in a public sector position that appears in awe of qualifications, and as such – despite her track record – had to nip off rather late in life and acquire a Masters in order to accommodate the tick-box HR dept.

  11. So Much for Subtlety

    Can I just point out the obvious – clearly to satisfy the Guardian’s incessant need for more social justice, those of us who have a degree or two and are comfortable well off, also have a moral obligation to have a child or two with a pretty secretary? Or maybe a young hairdresser.

    Only by breaking the barriers between classes can we create true social justice!

    Needless to say marriage is a heteronormative patriarchal concept and is not required in these circumstances. I am sure the wife will understand. Especially if she reads the Guardian.

    Gentleman of Britain, a grim task awaits you. But face it like men we must!

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