Not sure this particularly works

Dieters hoping to shed the pounds should watch the clock as much as their calories after scientists discovered that limiting the hours we eat stops weight gain.

Confining meals to a 12 hour window, such as 8am to 8pm, and fasting for the remaining day, appears to make a huge difference to whether fat is stored, or burned up by the body.

For the entirety of my adult life my eating pattern has been within that 12 hour time span. Yet I still ended up porky and having to take matters in hand.

On the other side of it though, think how lardbucketty I would have become if I’d been eating outside that 12 hour span…..

21 thoughts on “Not sure this particularly works”

  1. bloke (not) in spain

    Now that is interesting.
    Unlike Tim, I find it almost impossible to put on weight. And I eat way above any recommended calorie intake & mostly the sort of things are guaranteed to put on the podge.
    But I’m an honorary dog.
    Life style means I usually confine most of the eating to once a day. Usually evening.

  2. Calories in versus calories out. If you stuff your face with 10000 calories in a single ten minute binge, and then don’t eat for the remaining 23 hours 50 minutes, you’ll put on weight. If you nibble celery every ten minutes over the course of 24 hours, you’ll lose weight. Whether the calories are from protein, fat or carbs might make small differences to whether the weight gained is fat, muscle or other essential tissues, and hormonal balance can get skewed by periods of fasting, but believing there is a way to beat the laws of thermodynamics is the sort of thing I would expect our favourite accountant from Norwich to come out with. .

    Eat less,move more. Repeat.

  3. So Much for Subtlety

    worzel – “Calories in versus calories out. If you stuff your face with 10000 calories in a single ten minute binge, and then don’t eat for the remaining 23 hours 50 minutes, you’ll put on weight. If you nibble celery every ten minutes over the course of 24 hours, you’ll lose weight.”

    I don’t disagree with you but I don’t think that is a correct description of what they are measuring. I think they say they have found a problem with people who eat at night, but actually they have probably found a problem with people who open the fridge and gorge an entire chocolate cake in the middle of the night.

    Or at least such people greatly shift the average.

    What they have but don’t say or perhaps recognise is a measure of self control.

  4. Yes, it is the repeat bit which is important. People put on weight slowly over a period of years, so losing it takes a long time too. Two weeks on a diet isn’t going to help that much.

  5. Ramadan is a pretty good test of this theory on a sample of millions. Many Muslims will testify to gaining weight then, and there’s lots published for Muslim readers about how to avoid it.

    So I’d be very, very skeptical about this one.

  6. There’s no doubt that a protein rich diet will keep you lean and a carbohydrate rich diet will fatten you up.

    Why this is I don’t know – I’m not sure anyone really does – but it doesn’t seem to be about calories. I can stuff my face with a huge steak, with a nice crispy fatty edge, and a stack of veg or salad, and thinness ensues.

    If I eat bread and spuds to a roughly equivalent calorific value, the trouser begins to tighten.

  7. any Muslims will testify to gaining weight then, and there’s lots published for Muslim readers about how to avoid it.

    That may be because they have an enormous iftar feast every night instead of a normal meal.

  8. For anybody who is really interested in the science behind weight maintenance, I can’t recommend this guy highly enough. If you can get through the articles on the Physiology of Fat Loss, and Fat Loss Fundamentals, and learn about the effects of Insulin, Cortisol, Grehlin, AMpK and myriad other hormonal changes when we change the way we eat, trust me, whatever hours you spend now will save hundreds of hours of your life you would have wasted on reading future quack diet articles

    http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/category/fat-loss/physiology-fat-loss/

    http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/category/fat-loss/fat-loss-fundamentals/

    http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/fat-loss/ampk-master-metabolic-regulator.html/

  9. “If I eat bread and spuds to a roughly equivalent calorific value, the trouser begins to tighten.” That’s why people used to say that Italian women got fat in middle age by eating too much pasta.

    Mediterranean diet, my arse. Or rather theirs.

  10. If you eat late at night, your blood sugar is high while you’re asleep and you wake up ravenous, so it’s harder to stick to a calorie limit for breakfast. When I was losing weight I tended to eat one big meal in the middle of the day and a snack in the evenings. I lost 25 kg living mostly off kebabs and supermarket oven pies.

  11. The ‘research’ was in mice, so applying to Humans is a stretch.

    There is little detail, but supposedly the same amount of calories ware made available to some mice 24/24 and others for just a 12 hour period.

    Those on the 12 hour stint put on less weight than the others.

    That could be because they were more active in the 12 foodless hours, looking for food, whereas the others did not have to bother.

    However it is not explained why the 24/24 mice ate their rations over a 24 period rather than eat it quickly as animals tend to do in case somebody else comes along and takes it.

    In Humans it has been recognised for a while that eating before 7pm and nothing after until morning, helps to stop weight gain.

    Also the later you eat, the greater the delay since the last feed, the more hungry you are, the more you eat.

    The body is more active for the few hours after a 7pm meal than a later one and being in bed asleep, when the body is most likely to store food as metabolism slows down and less energy is required.

    This would seem to be common sense, without the need to pester any mice.

  12. bloke (not) in spain

    “If you eat late at night, your blood sugar is high while you’re asleep and you wake up ravenous”
    Well I don’t. I rarely eat before 10pm. And often don’t eat until the next 10pm.
    But then, I’m not a slave to “I feel hungry, I must eat. NOW!!!” Because gratification is the key problem for podgers, isn’t it?
    If you ever have to try it, you’ll find you don’t actually start to suffer from lack of food intake for about a week.

  13. Oh for Pete’s sake – people differ. If someone comes up with a wheeze you can try it out and see if it works for you but don’t assume that it will or won’t before you try it out.
    @ Matthew L
    I’ve got into bad habits of usually eating brunch at 1 or 2 pm (but occasionally 3 pm) and then late at night. So it doesn’t follow that if one eats late at night one wakes up ravenous. It may well be true for you but it is not for me. [Yes, I do know that it would be better if I had a bowl of porridge for breakfast and ate less at night but it doesn’t fit in with my lifestyle]

  14. bloke (not) in spain

    John. The simple answer’s don’t eat so much. That’s all there is.
    The rest of it’s the refusal to come to terms with this.

  15. “What they have but don’t say or perhaps recognise is a measure of self control.”

    It’s controlled by automatic systems, like breathing is.

    Dieting is the equivalent of deciding that you have too much oxygen in your blood, holding your breath until you turn blue, and wondering why you can’t sustain it for long. Perhaps people just don’t have enough willpower…

    “People put on weight slowly over a period of years, so losing it takes a long time too. Two weeks on a diet isn’t going to help that much.”

    Diets, I’m told, cause you to lose weight for about 6 months, whereupon the weight loss levels off and you put it all back on over the next 5-10 years. It’s true that two week’s won’t do much – what you mostly lose then is water.

    Of course, if all you’re after is losing weight then that works just as well – consume less water than you sweat, and you’ll definitely lose weight. It makes as much sense, too.

    “The simple answer’s don’t eat so much.”

    The even simpler answer is to stop worrying about it. Your body’s supposed to do that. It’s normal, natural, and perfectly OK.

  16. Works for me. I’ve been eating at around 1pm and around 9pm for 20 years, same waist size as at 16 (77 cm), although about 12 kg more muscle. Eating all your food in 8 hours with a 16 hour fast is a well known protocol for gaining muscle while staying lean.

  17. @”Guy Herbert
    December 3, 2014 at 10:34 am
    Ramadan is a pretty good test of this theory on a sample of millions. Many Muslims will testify to gaining weight then, and there’s lots published for Muslim readers about how to avoid it.”
    But they eat the wrong time night and morning. Also they don’t drink water for many hours – which no doctor recommends

  18. Another thing that humans do (in the UK at least) between 8pm and 8am is to turn down the heating in winter. Unless it is furiously cold outside, people reduce domestic heating in the evening. When snugged up in bed, most folks reduce heating levels sufficient to take a trip to the bathroom without freezing en route.

    Under the duvet and comforted by internal energy buzz, we heat ourselves. We remembered to eat heartily at tea time, didn’t we?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *