On that campus rape culture

You might have heard about this story, the one where the woman is dragging a mattress around campus until the bloke leaves campus. As part of her thesis, naturellement.

Here’s the gobsmacking thing about it:

If three separate complaints against the same man could not persuade the hearing panels, how could anyone believe that justice was served?

That there’s three complaints does not make any of them actually true. And the female students do actually agree that they only spoke up when they checked stories with each other.

Sexual assault cases can sometimes come down to a matter of perspective, but Mr. Nungesser’s accusers say there can be no ambiguity about what he did. “It’s not safe for him to be on this campus,” Ms. Sulkowicz said this month. The women he assaulted “are forever emotionally scarred and fragile because of what he’s done to them. And me.”

Mr. Nungesser is similarly absolute. “People were like, maybe this is a misunderstanding,” he said of Ms. Sulkowicz’s charges. “But the matter of the fact is it’s not a misunderstanding.” He insists they had completely consensual sex. “What was alleged was the most violent rape, and that did not happen.”

As for groping, he says he attended the party but never went upstairs. And intimate partner violence? “Outside of a forced marriage or kidnapping, it just seems very hard to believe that a person would over and over again put themselves in a situation where they could expect this kind of behavior to occur.”

False reports of rape are rare, many experts say, and the federal Education Department is investigating scores of colleges for possibly violating federal rules in handling the complaints that are filed.

Mr. Nungesser said the charges against him, all filed within days of one another, were the result of collusion. The three women said in interviews with The New York Times that they decided to take action when they heard about one another’s experiences.

The groping case was initially decided against him, with a largely symbolic punishment of “disciplinary probation,” but he appealed. By the time the case was heard again his accuser had graduated and was unable, she said, to participate in the process. The decision was overturned. The university dropped the intimate partner violence charge after that accuser, saying she was exhausted by the barrage of questions, stopped answering emails over summer vacation. And in Ms. Sulkowicz’s case, the hearing panel found that there was not enough evidence. Her request for an appeal was denied.

To Mr. Nungesser’s accusers, the refusal to punish him in any way — as well as the myriad procedural errors, delays, contradictions and humiliations, both small and large, to which the women said they were subjected — is proof that the system was biased against them. If three separate complaints against the same man could not persuade the hearing panels, how could anyone believe that justice was served?

“To me he seems like a predator who attacks women, who does not ask for consent and does not know the line,” said the student who accused Mr. Nungesser of groping her, and who asked not to be publicly identified, as did the third accuser.
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To Mr. Nungesser, the facts that campus hearings have a lower burden of proof than criminal trials and that he was not allowed to bring up communications between himself and Ms. Sulkowicz after the night in question were proof that the process was biased against him. If despite those odds, the hearings were resolved in his favor, how could anyone doubt that justice was served?

The campus system operates on the balance of evidence, as the feminists desire. Not all reasonable doubt, as the criminal law requires. And all three cases were found, at the very least, not proven on the basis of that balance of evidence.

It’s hard to see that the bloke should be punished for something that the system quite clearly doesn’t think he did, given the process and the evidence.

24 thoughts on “On that campus rape culture”

  1. “The campus system operates on the balance of evidence, as the feminists desire. Not all reasonable doubt, as the criminal law requires.”

    And is biased against men, presumes complaints to be truthful and accurate, and reverses the burden of proof.

    And still couldn’t satisfy itself in this case.

  2. They don’t care.

    In their relentless quest for victimhood, they would quite happily engage in a lynching.

    When lynchings were more common, the victim was invariably a black man executed on the mere word of a white woman. Now they’re turning on white men, and Obama is supporting them.

    The 1-5 is a victim would mean that they were experiencing sexual assaults at a similar rate to women in war torn Congo where rape is used as a weapon of war.

    It’s just hysterical and cruel and bullshit all at once.

  3. The whole problem with this case seem to be it shouldn’t be dealt with through a University disciplinary procedure, it should be delath with in the criminal system.
    Universities aren’t set up to investigate and make decisions on seroius allegations, so get themselves into all sorts of problems when they try.

  4. I had heard the legend of Mattress Girl, traipsing around her soiled bedding like a postmodern parody of the stations of the cross.

    And being the cynical bastard I am, I immediately filed her “rape” story under “bollocks”.

    Rape is a disgusting, humiliating, vile crime. It’s one of the worst things one human being can do to another, short of murder.

    Real victims of rape don’t turn it into avant garde street theatre and use it to get academic credit. Real rape victims are terrified of their rapists and, if they decline to press criminal charges to put them in prison where they belong, it’s because they’re too afraid to testify, not because the criminal justice process is too much hassle.

    False reports of rape are rare, many experts say

    But they’re not rare any more. In the past, they probably were a lot rarer than now, when sexual and gender mores were different and women had little to gain from making up a false accusation.

    Those days are long gone. Being a “rape survivor” is now a position of honour in feminist circles – a sort of secular martyrdom without the unpleasant death thing religious martyrs suffered. There is a veritable rape crisis industry in American academia, with counsellors, task forces, speakers, workshops and sensitivity training jobs galore in that field.

    The rape accuser can expect to be showered with sympathy and gratifying attention, and (at American universities) to have the satisfaction of seeing her alleged attacker hounded off campus by feminist officials operating on a presumption of guilt and with no semblance of due process for the supposed rapist. In Britain she can reasonably expect to be handled with kid gloves by the police and not to be prosecuted for making false allegations.

    So rape allegations are not rare any more. Prosecutions of women who lie about rape are rare though:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/crime/10928770/Trainee-lawyer-who-falsely-accused-boyfriend-of-rape-is-jailed.html

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2358759/Leanne-Black-finally-jailed-FIVE-false-rape-allegations-ex-boyfriends-years.html

  5. I’m not commenting on the rest because I don’t know the facts of the case, but this is completely wrong:

    “Outside of a forced marriage or kidnapping, it just seems very hard to believe that a person would over and over again put themselves in a situation where they could expect this kind of behavior to occur.”

    People do this all the time. Look at how long it takes the typical victim of domestic violence to leave their partner. Humans just aren’t as simple as that.

  6. It’s a matter for the courts. I don’t understand why people think that rape, or any other crime, is a matter for hearings in a university. It’s a crime. That is what the court system is specifically for. It’s why we have one.

    I mean, it’s like if I think Tim Worstall has committed a crime against me (like, he broke into my shed and stole my lawnmower) I don’t go to some Institute Of Bloggers committee, I go to the police. Why on Earth are universities involved in this? At all?

    And no, dragging a mattress around doesn’t pass my sniff test either.

  7. My lawyer has advised me to add that the above comment is not intended to imply in any way that Tim Worstall broke into my shed and stole my lawnmower.

  8. This whole episode is another example of Economics 101: people respond to incentives.

    Incentivise victimhood by privileging being a victim, and people will look for ways to maximise their victimhood.

  9. …Including by lying and ruining other peoples’ lives.

    Which really serves to diminish the genuine cases, for whom the correct recourse in the case of such a terrible crime is, and should only be, the criminal justice system.

  10. … the above comment is not intended to imply in any way that Tim Worstall broke into my shed and stole my lawnmower.
    But we all know he would, because, err, um… PATRIARCHY! Ruining his life is a small price to pay for SOCIAL JUSTICE!!!

  11. So Much for Subtlety

    Matt W – “Lynch Law Feminism.”

    Femilynching.

    I would point out in passing all the men who are enabling them to get away with it. Some poor boy has had his life ruined and everyone has let him – and these girls to be honest – down. Not just the university which should have told her to stop bullying him. But also his peers who did not stand with him. Her peers who encouraged her. The girls’ parents who have not given them a good slapping and so on.

  12. “another example of Economics 101”: does that course consist entirely of statements of the bloody obvious? Are there really eighteen-year olds so thick and ignorant that they need that pointing out to them?

    “It is all obvious or trivial except… “: comparative advantage, wasn’t it?

  13. Suppose a mad rapist enters a campus and sees a girl dragging a mattress about. Tally-ho! No risk from glass there.

  14. “Though his name is not widely known beyond the Morningside Heights campus, Mr. Nungesser is one of America’s most notorious college students. His reputation precedes him.”

    And thanks to the New York Times, it now is.

  15. “If three separate complaints against the same man could not persuade the hearing panels, how could anyone believe that justice was served?”

    It’s that reverse Sharia again. Coming to a People’s Court near you, soon.

  16. Also, i gather, coming soon to a court near you, complainants in such cases will be referred to as “survivors”.

  17. Ed Lud – also (I’m sure you’ve heard the whispers) professional specialist juries and alterations to the burden of proof.

  18. Body camera, it’s not just for cops anymore. Record everything lads, it’s your video against her words, and even in this day and age, that may not be enough.

  19. So Much for Subtlety

    Interested – “also (I’m sure you’ve heard the whispers) professional specialist juries and alterations to the burden of proof.”

    You know the system is f*cked when people can seriously suggest a jury made up of Julie Bindel’s friends is sensible.

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