Timmy elsewhere

At the ASI:

Alarming economic ignorance from Aditya Chakrabortty.

15 thoughts on “Timmy elsewhere”

  1. “They’ve begun hassling banks to lend more to local businesses, the likes of British Gas to give more of their local work to local contractors with local staff – or run the risk of being named and shamed in the local press.”

    Ooh, I’ll bet they’re quaking. the 1% of bearded activists in Enfield will stop shopping there (note to self: start shopping at Tesco)

    When did the socialists become such a group of small minded localists wanting local shops for local people? Weren’t they the ones chanting that The Internationale unites the human race some decades ago? Isn’t Tesco in Enfield buying beef from farmers in Wiltshire and farmers in Wiltshire buying Adele records from Enfield part of their vision?

    What do they want? Cockfosters dug up and turned into fields full of carrots and turnips? Barnet high-tech companies put out of business so they can have factories making socks?

    And these people have the front to call themselves progressives.

  2. Stigler — Good points – I’ve wondered this myself. The hair-shirt brigade of modern progressives really are a odd bunch. They’re (ostensibly) for the working man, but they don’t want the working man to enjoy the fruits of his labour.

    I actually had a weird, grudging respect for the late Bob Crow – a hack asked him once if he was a hypocrite for being a hardcore socialist and also going on nice holidays to Brazil with the family. His answer was something on the lines of ‘Bollocks, if I had my way, everyone would be able to afford nice holidays’.

    That sort of old-school leftism is a thing of the past now — my old man is from that group — he was involved in his union, etc and said that it was in the mid-80s onwards that the single issue bores started dominating their meetings with calls to boycott this and that. Quite bemused/befuddled the old-timers who wanted to talk about such trifling matters as pay and job conditions.

  3. If I was Tesco I would certainly spend some more cash in Enfield. I would hire a small army of private eyes and forensic accountants to look over the council books and the economic activities of both councillors and council staff. And I would hold a big party next Xmas–in store–with free food and drink for shoppers, the general public and a large number of reporters etc to publicise what had been found out in our jolly investigation. It would be a day Enfield would never forget.

  4. We are losing our way.

    What do I actually pay taxes for? Isn’t it all for the communal stuff that they seem to want companies to provide?

    Should I be running a food bank in the ground floor of our office?

    When did Corporate Income Tax become the definitive measure of a business for society?

    The world back-to-front.

    It can’t be that we are spending too much on frivolities, can it?

  5. Dan,

    “I actually had a weird, grudging respect for the late Bob Crow – a hack asked him once if he was a hypocrite for being a hardcore socialist and also going on nice holidays to Brazil with the family. His answer was something on the lines of ‘Bollocks, if I had my way, everyone would be able to afford nice holidays’.”

    Crow was an odd case because he was like a 1970s socialist, people who deep down had the same desires as Thatcher – raising living standards of working people. Most people with that desired outcome realised that socialism didn’t work.

  6. When did the socialists become such a group of small minded localists?

    a good question.

    It’s so bleeding stupid.

  7. “Crow was an odd case because he was like a 1970s socialist, people who deep down had the same desires as Thatcher – raising living standards of working people”

    Actually, his aim was to raise the living standards of his union’s members. Not necessarily the same thing.

    As for the “jobs only for locals” lark – is he running a “no jobs for immigrants” line here? How long must the ‘local’ have been in Enfield? A year? A week? Since birth? Isn’t it a bit unfair that the citizens of Enfield should get to ring fence their own jobs but still have excellent transport links to other areas, giving them access to opportunities there too?

  8. “Why is this so difficult for people to understand?”

    Because their livelihoods depend on not understanding it.

  9. It’s not economic ignorance. It’s Enfield council setting out its stall out to be the Godfather. That’s a nice business you’ve got there Mr. Tesco, it’d be a shame if something happened to it.

    From the article: “11 Tesco stores, for instance, provided the PLC with around £8m of its annual profit. And what did the area get back?”

    The PLC got £8 million profit. The people of Enfield got many millions more worth of food. The council got virtually bugger all. They are not representing ‘the people’ any more they are representing ‘the area’.

    Politicians at every level try this game to varying degrees of success – moving from representing people to claiming to represent something more nebulous and less able to hold you to account (be it the ‘area’, the environment or future generations).

  10. Their are a couple of glorious comments on the ASI site.

    1. Tim is accused of picking on “easy targets”, meaning the Guardian. I agree with that actually!
    2. The ever reliable Keith Hudson accused Yes Co and Sainsbury of being a cartel… Whilst simultaneously pointing out Lidl and Aldi breaking into the market.

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