Timmy elsewhere

At the ASI.

Dissing Ms. Mazzucato again.

12 thoughts on “Timmy elsewhere”

  1. There was no “collective” effort in “Silicon valley” (back to 1984 in more ways than one) there was no plan, no grand scheme etc. The efforts of many people working out their own plans created something–what is the word?–an epiphenomenon–to which fuckwit pundits gave a name.

    Speaking of fuckwits how much does this one earn?. I would be happy to read out shopping lists salvaged from litter bins on tv/radio(pref radio as everyone, myself included, would be spared sight of my ugly mug) for the same wages she is getting. That would be as useful and less destructive than the leftist shite she peddles.

  2. Such people really can’t fathom how something happens without there being some great, collective plan.

    It’s economic creationism, pure and simple.

  3. Hudson made one remark so stupid that I felt obliged to pour scorn on it. Not like me at all. Abacab’s “It’s economic creationism” is awfully good. Hats off, sir.

  4. @Dearime – thanks, but I can’t claim originality for it 🙂 Can’t for the life of me remember who coined it though.

  5. Things don’t just happen. My limited intelligence takes me that far.

    And it is true that if I invent/innovate the iPhone7 it is because of all that has gone before and all that already is, when I am being so brilliant.

    But does this Professor wish to make be believe that it is all because the State?

    The road from Bilbao to Madrid started as a lot of small paths between villages for trade. As trade multiplied the paths became tracks and….. I am sure you can see where I am going…. Nobody planned it and said we need this so Bilbaoboy can invent the iPhone7 in 2015. Or did they?

    Only collectivists believe the State has given me something. In reality we have given ourselves everything, directly doing it or indirectly through our agents. Our servants (something they have forgotten) execute some things (unfortunately ever more) on our behalf (usually middling to badly) and the rest of us get on with it.

    When my leftie friends say the State does this and does that (implying that nothing would happen without it) etc. etc., all I ask is where does the money come from and are you happy with what you get (they are nearly all uni lecturers, civil servants of one type or another or retired local politicians). None are happy with the way the State allocates resources, not even when it is their party.

    The discovery of ‘inequality’ has cheered them up no end. Just when there was nothing really left to fight over….

    I can’t help thinking that the level of inequality in a feudal society must have been much greater than today. But, eat the rich!

  6. Perhaps she could provide a few examples from what must be an incredibly long list of “innovations” arising in the USSR, East Germany and China?

    Things that were invented during State control because of State control.

    No? Shame.

  7. John millar –

    The consumer drives innovation. Given that the only real consumer with any purchasing power in the USSR was the military, there was plenty of innovation. Just in military hardware. And only then in that stuff they didn’t just reverse-engineer from stolen Western designs.

  8. So Much for Subtlety

    Mr Ecksmas – “There was no “collective” effort in “Silicon valley” (back to 1984 in more ways than one) there was no plan, no grand scheme etc. The efforts of many people working out their own plans created something–what is the word?–an epiphenomenon–to which fuckwit pundits gave a name.”

    Silicon Valley was mainly the result of two accidents. First William Shockley’s mother became ill about the same time that he alienated everyone at Bell Labs to the point they would no longer work with him. So he moved back to be closer to her. Second, his interesting and colourful management style alienated pretty much everyone leading to the famous Shockley Eight leaving the company and starting Fairchild Semiconductors.

    Had his mother lived in Ohio or his personality been just a little less autistic, Silicon Valley would never have happened. At least not there. Maybe Cleveland would have outrageous property prices instead.

  9. SMfS:
    I’m not so sure, although it is an interesting conjecture. While Shockley and the ‘traitorous eight’ were a big part of the picture, from the beginning the Valley depended on infusions of talent from Stanford, and particularly the encouragement from Fred Terman to commercialize academic research. I doubt that the equivalent combination could have been found elsewhere. Shockley was perhaps ‘necessary but not sufficient’ to create SV as we know it; I suspect SV would have developed more slowly, and would have been less dominant in the high-tech landscape had Shockley stayed at Bell, or not alienated everyone at Beckman / Shockley.

  10. So Much for Subtlety

    dcardno – “While Shockley and the ‘traitorous eight’ were a big part of the picture, from the beginning the Valley depended on infusions of talent from Stanford, and particularly the encouragement from Fred Terman to commercialize academic research.”

    So the usual story goes. But in reality? What has Stanford actually contributed? A lot of grunts it is true. Hewlett Packard? Cisco?

    Compare that with the spin offs from Shockley – silicon-based integrated circuits for one thing. Intel for another. Basically the Eight created real computers.

    “I suspect SV would have developed more slowly, and would have been less dominant in the high-tech landscape had Shockley stayed at Bell, or not alienated everyone at Beckman / Shockley.”

    Shockley also created a different culture in Fairchild. They were determined not to be him. So Robert Noyce was a very approachable manager – no obvious hierarchy, no suits, egalitarian work places, stock options, and so on. The Silicon Valley corporate model was largely his work.

    Suppose Shockley had taken the integrated circuit to Rochester New York – and Xerox then decided to keep their research closer to home and so didn’t build in Palo Alto. You really think people would have ever heard of Silicon Valley?

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