Genuine question here

Professor Mike Richards, CQC chief inspector of hospitals signalled that the inspections findings were among the worst it has ever published, with the trust being the first ever to have been branded “inadequate” for caring.


Is this report
(or grade given in the report perhaps) better or worse than whatever was given to Mid Staffs?

If so, or either way, why?

16 thoughts on “Genuine question here”

  1. Difficult to say as the Hinchingbrooke report was done under the new inspection system that was introduced after Mid-Staffs, so they’re not directly comparable.

  2. So Much for Subtlety

    Unity – “Difficult to say as the Hinchingbrooke report was done under the new inspection system that was introduced after Mid-Staffs, so they’re not directly comparable.”

    Don’t the bureaucrats love changing the system so that nothing is directly comparable.

    I would assume that any inspection system worth its salt has a “fail” grade. They may call it something else, but the concept of being manifestly inadequate for purpose is just inherent in any process of inspection outside Lewis Carrol’s more amusing fiction.

    So I am guessing Mid Staff passed every single year. Probably everyone got a bonus.

  3. the inspections findings were among the worst it has ever published

    Do they always publish inspection findings?

  4. Bloke in North Dorset

    Maybe we can’t compare inspection reports but we can compare headlines and from what I’ve read I’d rather have been admitted to Hitchingbrooke than mid Staffs.

  5. You should be able to compare the excess death rate which, if I recall, is published by Dr Foster.

    As an aside, I remember my former NHS colleagues earnestly agreeing that there shouldn’t be a search for “scapegoats” in the wake of Mid-Staffs. I asked them how many people died at Winterbourne View and how many of its staff were now in jail!

  6. “there shouldn’t be a search for “scapegoats””: spot on. There should be a search for perpetrators though, and then you can cut their goolies off.

  7. The report might be a smear job for political reasons. But it might also be true. Corporate socialism is very little better than state socialism. Most of the failings quoted in the paper seem to be poor treatment–ie human failure. Did the “private” contractors replace all the prev NHS people with their own employees? Doubt it.

  8. There should be a search for perpetrators though, and then you can cut their goolies off.

    Quite. Somebody said on here that when somebody in senior management anywhere says “We need to move on…” that is a sure sign that you should stop right there and launch a thorough investigation.

  9. Mr Ecks has identified the problem: NHS culture. Also politicians’ aversion to tackling it. Handing over management does not solve problems without new working practices on every level in which patient care is made paramount not bureaucrazy.

  10. I’d put some decent money on all of the staff below a very senior level being the same staff as before, just a change of employer. I can’t see the unions allowing anything else.

    So same people, different hat – but the hat makes all the difference.

  11. So same people, different hat ->

    As an inspection body, the CQC has issues (e.g. see the ongoing arguments re GP practices). That said, it’s notable that many of their concerns at Hinchingbrooke relate to short-staffing in emergency/theatre settings, as well as observed examples involving ward & (note the red flag here) agency staff. Whatever the provider, having enough boots at the bedside is still the keystone of proper care. As for “their own employees” – who would that be? An elite cadre of Circle-trained nurses? Ex-headshed Ali Parsa had form for bashing the NHS in the media, even as Circle remained utterly dependant upon its workforce and acute capacity – it takes the fucking piss.

    We can play ideological tennis all night with Mid.Staffs and Hinchingbrooke. The meaningful comparison is across the sector right now: everybody is under the same pressure – it’s just that Circle can walk away. My own Trust has no such option.

  12. Short-staffing is hard to blame as a cause of elderly people dying of thirst/starvation. The point–or one of them- was that Circle don’t have their own people so it was the same crew regardless of titles at the top. Which is one of many reasons why corporate socialism is very nearly as useless as state socialism. The whole lot has to go over the next thirty or so years on a carefully planned system to replace, one bit at a time, both the state and the state’s proxies, the kiss-a-bureaucrats-arse “businessmen” . And replace them with the truly private.. You pay for and insure yourself and your loved ones. And you are the customer with full power of choice between many competing providers of medical services.

  13. Short-staffing is hard to blame as a cause of elderly people dying of thirst/starvation.

    Patients suffer as the result of neglect by staff. Patients also suffer when there aren’t enough staff to maintain proper levels of care. The two aren’t somehow mutually exclusive possibilities – the end-result is the same. And if you are a health provider making big heap boasts in the media, you best be damn sure that the patient care matches the PR.

    As for the future: robots.

  14. Robots: What is that–an update on the advice Dustin Hoffman was given in The Graduate?.

    I don’t disagree that understaffing is bad and makes things worse for patients. However unless the staff/patient ratio is now about 1 per 1000 , I disagree that you can be so understaffed that you don’t notice people dying of thirst/starvation right in front of you. Mrs Gamp would have noticed that–at least when she was sober–and there is no excuse for it in the NHS.

  15. Not just this hospital.
    I knew a lad who was in the Queen Liz in Birmingham, could not feed himself. His family, coming in after work of an evening, were feeding him his first meal of the day. Every day. They got held up in traffic one day and couldn’t get in before visiting time was over then not allowed in. He had no food or water that day at all.
    That was about 7 years ago. Heard of a guy with similar problems a couple of years back – likely same staff, same procedures etc. After all, not as if someone missing entire meals is going to get well quicker eh? Never mind lying in your own waste for several hours at a time.

    NHS has its problems, not just in staffing levels but getting the staff to do the darn work.

  16. What is that…?

    There’s a great future in plastic robots.

    so understaffed that you don’t notice people dying… there is no excuse

    I wholeheartedly agree. I would also say that many clinical incidents, complaints and CQC concerns have a relatively simple (and thus preventable) genesis – and all too often it results from a lack of boots on the ground.

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