Well, that’s the last time I use IE for a bit

Computer blew up, hardware’s so cheap these days that even trying to find someone to fix it ain’t worth it. So, €300 on another typewriter with a browser attached.

Hmm.

But this does mean that I’ve had to use IE for the first time in several years. And hopefully it will be the last time I need to for several years…..

29 thoughts on “Well, that’s the last time I use IE for a bit”

  1. “And hooefully it will be the last time….”

    Take your machine back and get it replaced by one with a working keyboard.

  2. Windows 10 will be killing off IE for good, or so they say.

    Although when I heard that it was like learning that some old actor had died … when you thought they’d already died some years ago.

  3. I wish something would kill of that abortion of a browser that Google spam onto everything that moves. I wish something would kill off Google, come to that.

  4. Why are things still complicated. Why should anyone need to know what a browser is etc. When you read a book you just read it. No need for printing knowledge.

  5. john malpas

    Er…. No.
    You need to know a lot to read book.
    – How to hold it
    – How to open the pages
    – Direction forward and back through the pages
    – Pages numbered in ascending order, some roman, some arabic
    – Meaning of blank pages
    – Type of book = will there be a contents list / index?
    – Some books have the contents list at the beginning, some at the end, some no contents list at all.
    – Relation of contents list / index to page numbers
    – Type if index : complete / names / subjects
    – Presence of preface / forward

    Need I go on?

    You didn’t realize you were so smart, did you?
    In contrast IE is a breeze. I’ll let you do the interface analysis.

    BTW: ‘Tim Worstall is right about all things’™

  6. Ritchie in 2010:

    “It irritates me that people don’t appreciate what tax does for them. So I’m going to write about what tax does for me. And ask others to do the same. Twitter it using #TheJoyofTax”

    He came up with 4 blogs/tweets…

    1. Nature reserves
    2. Providing roads
    3. Emptying the bins
    4. The Police

    ….and then gave up. It’s not going to be a long book then.

  7. Swap the “spinning platter” hard drive with an SSD. The performance difference is phenomenal, for not much cash.
    256GB for £80.

  8. So Much for Subtlety

    I feel sorry for anyone forced to use IE. A shame.

    Just in passing, although it is off topic, the Guardian tries to defend medical tourism – even though they have to admit they have no idea what foreigners are costing the NHS.

    But what I like is that they manage to spin the fact that more British people leave the country for medical treatment than come is a good thing for the NHS. Even though a more reasonable interpretation might be the NHS is so bad, you can’t give it away for free.

    http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/oct/24/medical-tourism-generates-millions-nhs-health

  9. Not so much IE that’s the problem – trying to use any browser without adblock installed is simply awful.

  10. Bloke in Costa Rica

    Unless they fry wholesale, most computers can be restored to working order for a lot less than a new one. Power supplies are cheap and hard drives are virtually free (Kryder’s Law has an even shorter time constant than Moore’s Law, even if it’s fallen off a bit of late). Those are the two components that most frequently blow up. Replacing them is a matter of finding a Phillips-head screwdriver. If it’s a software issue then just wipe and restore from backup (everyone has a backup, right?)

  11. By way of coincidence my stalwart number two PC (I use it to run XP and do my email) blew up two days ago. Loud sudden crackling bang, heady smell of burnt phenolics. Swapped the PSU, wouldn’t boot. Took all the cards out, wouldn’t boot. Put the video card back in (remembered that they like to have a VGA card) and it booted, then put all the cards back in and it’s now running fine again. Not entirely sure why it wouldn’t just start with the new PSU, but “take it apart and put it back together” is a kind of magical incantation with electronic and mechanical things so, there you go.

    Much cheaper and less effort than a new PC, about an hour of diddling around that would’ve otherwise been squandered watching funny cat videos or fantasising about politicians dangling from hempen rope or something.

  12. That’s an hour diddling around for you. And three days diddling around for me. And I can earn 300 in three days…..rather more in fact,…..meaning that my opportunity cost tells me to spend the hour going to the store and spending the money.

  13. Off topic, so apologies, but I had to comment after following that link on health tourism posted by So Much for Subtlety.

    So much weirdness. It’s almost as if the article is cherry-picking any numbers it can find to try to discredit the Government’s position, even if they don’t.

    For example:

    “The researchers also found that more people leave the UK seeking medical treatment abroad than arrive in this country for care: about 63,000 people from the country travelled to hospitals and clinics abroad in 2010, while considerably fewer, about 52,000 people, came here.”

    Further down the article:

    “People from the UK travelled abroad for procedures they could not get on the NHS or where the waiting lists were too long. The study looked at those travelling for fertility treatment, bariatric surgery (to reduce the stomach size in obese patients) and cosmetic surgery.”

    So, because some people can’t get treated by the NHS for specific issues, or can’t get treatment in a reasonable time, they have decided to get (probably private) treatment abroad rather than go private in the UK. This apparently makes up for NHS medical tourism. In some way.

    If that’s their argument, why not exclude more and more locals from being treated for common conditions and make them go abroad too? Then the numbers will get better and better.

    They also argue that health tourism is a net benefit because the visitors spend money in the wider economy while they are here. So now spending more money on other things excuses not making a legally required payment.

    I must try that argument at my local tax office.

  14. Er, why is there “NHS medical tourism”? Don’t the NHS charge forriners? Last time I was in need of medical attention in the UK they were extremely keen to get hold of my insurance details, so they could charge it to them. If they aren’t doing this routinely, or sending invoices to the uninsured, they are doing something very wrong.

  15. “Public Health” tells you all you need to know. The Marxist wing of the medical profession. The sneer about ‘immigration policy’ doesn’t suggest impartial study but Lefty agitprop.

  16. Noel Scoper,

    The problem is that that’s a massive strawman, because no-one has a problem paying for the police, roads and bins. There’s probably a few too many nature reserves now, but again, they cost something close to fuck all to maintain and run (and mostly run on volunteers).

    You could pretty much pay for government from household rates alone if that was all the state was.

  17. bloke (not) in spain

    BiG
    Do you have an honesty problem? As in too much of it?

    Blew in from furrin a few years back. Needed something medical done but didn’t fancy leaving paw prints all over official paperwork. Went to a hospital. made up a name & some collateral nonsense, got sorted*, blew out.
    *Whole thing was a complete f**k-up but that’s the NHS. Free crap at the point of delivery.

  18. b(n)if… No real need for subterfuge.. A few years ago I took an old American friend to our local A&E becoz he’d slipped and fractured his wrist. He was X-Rayed, bones reset and plastered up… When he reached for his credit card he was told “no charge Sir, all part of the service”. 🙂

  19. b(n)is,

    A Uni friend of mine recently posted on Facebook that the NHS had been good around his wife’s second delivery, and that those criticising it must be seeing something he’s not.

    I said words to the effect of “yes, I have seen something you’ve not – the Dutch and Swiss systems, where such treatment is standard and nothing to write home about”. I’m now defriended. Ho hum.

    National religion and all that…

  20. “That’s an hour diddling around for you. And three days diddling around for me. ”

    It’s ironic that Tim’s so proud of his total lack of knowledge, and yet still thinks he has a valid opinion on the merits of IE. People shitting on things they don’t understand are normally a ripe target for this blog.

    IE has many merits in a business environment. Doesn’t even do too badly compared to Chrome in a non-work situation, either. And at least it’s not fucking Firefox.

    (Of course, I’m typing this using Chrome.)

  21. > IE has many merits in a business environment

    It has? I’m astonished. Though I haven’t been paying attention for the last few years. Care to name one?

    It has certainly had business-oriented features, but they turned out to be poorly-hidden traps. Sure caught a whole lot of businesses though.

  22. It’s ironic that Tim’s so proud of his total lack of knowledge, and yet still thinks he has a valid opinion on the merits of IE. People shitting on things they don’t understand are normally a ripe target for this blog.

    Doesn’t make him wrong though: those of us that do know something about the subject also think it’s utter shit.

    It’s a well-known rule of thumb when writing a web application that 90% of the time is spent making it work on Firefox, Chrome, Safari (and Opera when we used to care about that); and the other 90% of the time is spent trying to bodge something that looks vaguely acceptable on IE.

  23. AT>

    It’s much, much more stable – as in unchanging – than Chrome, which is the only other decent browser right now. That’s important to a certain type of business. It’s much easier to administer and lock down, too, which is often important to the same kinds of companies. Will two general examples do you? I could go on, but the reason I got out of this field was so I wouldn’t have to talk about IE 😉

    BiW>

    You’ll note that I didn’t expressly say he was wrong 🙂

    “It’s a well-known rule of thumb”

    Now that, on the other hand, is total nonsense. No statement along those lines has so far remained true for more than a few months, browser share (and compatibility) changes so fast.

    For a sizeable chunk of internet history, the web default was IE. Ironically, that’s back when it really was total shite. Now, though, it’s far more competitive than it used to be despite having a much smaller market share.

  24. BiW,

    “Doesn’t make him wrong though: those of us that do know something about the subject also think it’s utter shit.

    It’s a well-known rule of thumb when writing a web application that 90% of the time is spent making it work on Firefox, Chrome, Safari (and Opera when we used to care about that); and the other 90% of the time is spent trying to bodge something that looks vaguely acceptable on IE.”

    That was true with earlier versions but 9, 10 and 11 play pretty nicely.

    I have more trouble with mobile Safari than anything else now.

  25. Now that, on the other hand, is total nonsense. No statement along those lines has so far remained true for more than a few months, browser share (and compatibility) changes so fast.

    The difference between good browsers, and IE, is that the former implement net standards to a far higher level of compatibility and competence. So it doesn’t really matter which browser you pick out of Firefox, Chrome or Safari: you’ll get a mostly equivalent level of standards compliance.

    Of course, to use the latest and greatest standard, you’ll require the latest and greatest version of the browser – but you should be upgrading regularly anyway just to get security fixes.

    That was true with earlier versions but 9, 10 and 11 play pretty nicely.

    I will agree that 10 and 11 are better (9 is still pretty bad – it still needs hacks like css3pie for CSS3 support, htm5shiv for HTML5, etc), but I wouldn’t call it “playing nicely”.

    I have more trouble with mobile Safari than anything else now.

    Agreed – but then mobile is a whole new can of worms 🙂

  26. @Pogo, BniS, BiG

    Emergency and compulsory (psychiatric / infectious disease) treatment such as that given to Pogo’s friend is free for everybody. It doesn’t cost all that much.

    Entitlement to the NHS otherwise, is currently based on residency and not on citizenship or origin, although the Tories are restricting that next year (by implementing an annual charge for some of those who have temporary residency). The figures for “health tourism” include those with temporary residence. Does Jeremy Hunt expect an Indian working here on a 2 year contract to go to India when he gets a cold requiring hospital admission?

    Currently, if you lie and say you live in the UK, then you will be believed unless it is obviously false. If you tell them that you don’t then you will be charged – in the case of EEA residents, to the other EEA country. Most visitors pay for their treatment.

    Whether this is going to change next year is a different matter.

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