This was actually predicted

The “feminisation” of GPs has led to a shortage of family doctors which could fuel demands for even bigger wages, Government advisers have warned.

More than half of GPs are women and many are more likely to want to work part-time fuelling the shortfall.

It costs just as much to train a part time GP as it does a full time one. Perhaps the solution would be to have part timers paid at less than pro rata?

9 thoughts on “This was actually predicted”

  1. So Much for Subtlety

    It costs just as much to train a part time GP as it does a full time one. Perhaps the solution would be to have part timers paid at less than pro rata?

    Well the obvious solution was not to bias the entire education system against boys to make sure there were more female doctors? But, hey, that would make Ironman and Polly mad so we can’t do that.

    The other solution is the obvious one – make the little swots pay the full market value for their education. Then if they make enough money, or they have a husband who is happy to pay, they can stay home four and a half days a week.

    Socialism, huh? Who would have guessed it has unforeseen side-effects?

  2. “More than half of GPs are women”

    What?!?! I assume there will be article after article in the Guardian demanding quotas to ensure that this discrimination against men ends. We need more male doctors regardless of their competence to fix this gross inequality.

  3. Of course a full time GP pays back the cost of their training a lot quicker. One who works 1.5 days a week may never do so.

  4. @So Much For Subtlety +1

    If the complaint is the cost of training being wasted, make them pay for their own training.

    If the problem is the Five Year Plan target for the number of doctors, the solution is to liberalise the market, allow wages/fees to float, (to draw in part timers with more hours, defer retirement, and bring in yanks, kiwis, aussies and so on) and allow medical schools to decide how many people to teach.

    The market for doctors is more or less global so if we were allowing wages/fees to float we wouldn’t have to worry about undersupply.

  5. Well, doctors are supposedly paying for their own training now in the form of student fees (although of course those fees don’t really cover the cost of a medical degree).

  6. “although of course those fees don’t really cover the cost of a medical degree”

    Well quite. So they should.

    With an average income of £100K let nobody say they couldn’t afford it.

  7. …bring in yanks, kiwis, aussies…
    there’s no barrier now to their coming. More doctors go the other way to Aus and NZ, and we get almost none from the USA, where they do charge medical students the cost of their education, and then pay them a lot more when they’re doctors.

    We do get a lot of doctors from India.

  8. The GP contract from Labour allowed them to keep office hours so part-time is just an extention of the principle of working whenever they feel like it. How about we expect them to be responsible for their patients who have no regard for what hours they fall ill? Like professionals not office workers? It used to work: if you couldn’t face long hours and duty of care, you didn’t become a GP or even a doctor.

  9. My wife’s a GP.

    She works the equivalent of two days a week – we have a child.

    I asked her when she was going to go full-time. She says “Never”.

    Meanwhile, I, as a non-medical person work full-time.

    Better than one of her medical school chums who qualified, married a surgeon, stopped working and will never work again as a doctor. Oh – and this was before student loans so financial penalties for her…

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