Yep, I fully agree with this

Nationalist politicians in Scotland and Wales are threatening to stop English voters forcing Britain to leave the European Union after a referendum.

Plaid Cymru leader Leanne Wood said that each individual nation in the UK should have its own separate vote on whether Britain should stay in the EU if there were a referendum.

If one of the nations voted against – then Britain would have to stay in the EU, she said.

This would the case even if voters in England – which is far larger than Scotland of Wales by population – voted by a majority to leave.

Miss Woods’ intervention mean the Celtic members of the UK are demanding an effective veto on ‘Brexit’, the term describing Britain leaving the EU.


No problem
at all with this idea. Except this idea does apply to everything. If you Celts want to elect idiots in red rosettes then that’s fine. But those votes don’t count as to who gets to rule England. You can vote for whatever level of taxation or public subsidy you like: but it doesn’t apply to England nor does England’s money get sent to you for you to spend.

In short, if you want to claim the rights of independence then off you go, be independent.

15 thoughts on “Yep, I fully agree with this”

  1. Small nation joins euro, major trading partner (80%?) keeps pound. What could possibly go wrong, look you, boyo.

  2. It’s entirely hypothetical as the next gov will probably be Milliwyrd propped up by the SNP. Now that’s irony for you.

  3. Not following your logic here, Tim — or rather I get the logic but I think your premise is all wrong. In what way can one nation exercising a veto over the policy of another be regarded as independence?

  4. OK, so they’ll table an amendment. If they lose the vote, they lose. If they win the vote, it will be with Labour votes and a massive own goal – the Conservatives, if they had any balls, could so so easily paint Labour as the party which sold out England for a handful of seats in Scotwales.

    If Milliweird has any sense at all he’ll treat this proposal like a bucket of cold sick.

  5. Well, we could soon have the most left-wing (coalition) government we’ve ever had. Then nothing will be impossible for them.

    In 2020 I wonder:

    What shape will the economy be in?

    Will civil war have broken out?

    Will the loons have been successful in transferring the finance capital of the world from London to Frankfurt?

    Will taxes rise to 80% of GDP?

    Will the debt have reached five trillion?

    If the answer to any of the above is yes, I’ll be sitting under an umbrella in Swaziland sipping a rather large gin and tonic. Come to think of it, I might do that anyway…

  6. It’s the United Kingdom that’s a member of the EU. It’ll be the United Kingdom that either leaves or doesn’t. As usual, the indiewankers are taking the Richard Rich approach to the rule of law when it suits them.

  7. Richard Gadsden

    Right up to the referendum vote I supported the Union. Now I want English indpendence, I want rid of the Scots.

    What do the Scots want? Just the grievance it seems.

  8. > What do the Scots want? Just the grievance it seems.

    Er, no. The Referendum showed quite clearly that the Scots want to stay in the UK.

    It is a sad legacy of the campaigning that the Yes voters have somehow succeeded in giving the English the impression that they represent the majority, despite the conclusive proof to the contrary, just because they were louder.

    > Right up to the referendum vote I supported the Union. Now I want English indpendence, I want rid of the Scots.

    Funny, I was the other way around. I was an instinctive (hypothetical) Yes voter before the Yes campaign opened their mouths, but they persuaded me towards No. I still think independence for Scotland could work out as a good idea, long-term, but such a big project needs to start off on the right foot, and rarely have I seen a foot wronger than the SNP’s Yes campaign.

  9. > Will the loons have been successful in transferring the finance capital of the world from London to Frankfurt?

    Nah. I think that’s one of those things where you make loads of noises while in opposition, maybe even believing it, then you win an election, start your first day at work, start reconciling your utopian plans with real responsibility, look at the reports on your desk, and think “Holy fuck, we can’t do that!”

    See also Obama’s promise to close Guantanamo.

  10. In the forthcoming Labour/SNP coalition government, who will be best qualified to be Chancellor of the Exchequer? Wee Eck! Or “Bloody Eck”as he’ll presumably be referred to.

  11. The Referendum showed quite clearly that the Scots want to stay in the UK.

    Therein lies the problem, because the ruling class in Scotland after May will be the SNP by a wide margin, elected by a Scottish electorate who may want the SNP, but who don’t overwealmingly want Scottish Independence, which is the whole raison d’être of the SNP.

    Maybe the SNP should use the UK government funds, largely paid for by the English middle class to buy themselves a new electorate?

    🙂

  12. > the ruling class in Scotland after May will be the SNP by a wide margin

    It might well be. However, the Referendum caused a lot of Scottish Unionists (probably a lot of them Tories) who hadn’t previously bothered voting to join the electoral register. I reckon this one’s going to be more difficult to predict than the SNP think.

  13. As a secessionist -not an Anglophobe – I can’t understand this.
    For the first time ever Scotland had a popular vote on the Union. Sadly (for me) it went No. This means that the Union is a legitimate and democratic expression of the will of the Scottish people. We have voted to allow ourselves to be a minority in the UK. We have NO right to complain if the UK (as a whole) make a decision that we don’t agree with. That’s what we voted for.

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