Yes, this will work, won’t it?

The Venezuelan parliament on Sunday approved a law giving the president, Nicolás Maduro, the power to legislate by decree for nine months in the face of what he described as threats by the US government.


Give the
idiot who caused the problems more power.

24 thoughts on “Yes, this will work, won’t it?”

  1. bloke (not) in spain

    I gather the Venezuelan army’s been conducting “exercises” over past few days. Seemed remarkably brave to let the generals play with toy soldiers. A war game involving the tanks rolling into Caracas is going to be how this ends, isn’t it?

  2. It would be hilarious if it weren’t so tragic.

    In this case, the physical image reflects the reality of the man.

    His achievements will go down in history.

    I only hope that the leftie luvvie arse-lickers will have the decency to admit publicly and humiliatingly that they were so stupidly wrong about the ‘great’ man that they recognise that they know nothing and that just before leaving journalism for a career in bus-driving.

  3. Having some first hand experience of Venezuela – this does not surprise me.

    See HERE

    Maduro doesn’t need special powers because he and his clique have all the power in the country.

    As to fuckwit lefty loons in the UK … that they suck this up approvingly just tells you what you need to know….

  4. just before leaving journalism for a career in bus-driving.

    Hopefully not of any bus I’m on (chances are good, I rarely slum it with the great unwashed, at least on a train you can travel first class).

    The problem you have is that it requires decency, if they had any they wouldn’t put the lives of ordinary Venezuelans ahead of their hateful ideology.

  5. bilbaoboy,

    A street sweepers cart might be worth the risk. But let’s face it, when you stop dreaming, they’ll be cheerleading for the next ant-USA, socialist despot who impoverishes his people. They just move from one train smash to the next without missing a beat or for a moment doubting their ideology.

  6. So Much for Subtlety

    bloke (not) in spain – “A war game involving the tanks rolling into Caracas is going to be how this ends, isn’t it?”

    In the good old days this would have ended a long time ago. The military tried in Venezuela. Ms Rice told them to go back to their barracks and they did.

    I think the Republican theory is that the military may save the nation in the short term. In the long term all they save is the Right. The feckless voters never learn because their experiments never end up badly. The military steps in too soon. Now the voters of Venezuela are going to get what they voted for, and get it good and hard.

    Now they are feeling the price of fecklessness. With luck it will result in two generations cured of fecklessness. But I doubt it.

  7. So Much for Subtlety

    “I think the Republican theory is that the military may save the nation in the short term. In the long term all they save is the Right.”

    >cough< I mean all they save is the Left. My mistake.

  8. To be fair, he probably took one look at Obama’s dismissal of the Senate in his dealings with Iran, and concluded if the US can be a banana republic and rule by unchecked executive power, then why shouldn’t he?

  9. In Venezuela PDVSA IS the government – the army likely won’t do anything unless the golden goose stops laying ….

    The prospect of civil unrest grows with every passing day – condoms at US$75 and no loo paper ….. there will be a revolution if breast implants and cosmetics are not available.

  10. bloke (not) in spain

    I’d lighten up on the racial superiority stuff, SMfS. I can’t see any difference, apart from degree, in what the Venezuelans have voted themselves & what the Brits have voted themselves. Or much of the EU, either.

  11. Bloke in Costa Rica

    I’m amazed that the shit hasn’t hit the fan yet. I have a theory (no doubt not an original one) that it’s not until the middle classes are made to truly suffer that change will come, but that when it does it will be rapid. You can grind yer basic proles in the dirt and they’ll grin and bear it. But the bourgeoisie, not so much. Right now Venezuelans with access to hard currency can scrape by, and there is the safety valve that they can go somewhere less screwed up, buy things, and come back. If Maduro restricts travel, implements exchange controls or expropriates dollar holdings then the wheels will come off in short order. He’s so thick I wouldn’t put it past him. Upside is that the resulting diaspora of astoundingly hot middle class Venezuelan girls will materially add to the (already high) aesthetic appeal of the region.

  12. So Much for Subtlety

    bloke (not) in spain – “I’d lighten up on the racial superiority stuff, SMfS. I can’t see any difference, apart from degree, in what the Venezuelans have voted themselves & what the Brits have voted themselves. Or much of the EU, either.”

    The British voter is stupid and feckless, often at the same time, but not to the same degree. Berlusconi could not have a political career in Britain. Yet. There isn’t a Latin country where he couldn’t. Latin voters are far more feckless and Venezuela is what they get. When they are lucky. Then they get Castro.

    In the end the British did vote for Thatcher. And the EU has been foisted on Britain through lies and executive action.

  13. Bloke in Costa Rica

    “There isn’t a Latin country where he couldn’t.”

    Not so. We’ve had a succession of fairly dull centrist managerial types for ages now. A Berlusconi would have about as much chance getting elected here as in Norway. The last election we had the Chávez-style lefty scraped about one vote in 6. The Libertarian candidate got 12%, which is a sight better than they tend to do in practically every other country, and I don’t mean just Latin American ones.

  14. So Much for Subtlety

    Costa Rica is an unusual oasis of competence and sanity in Latin America. But only relatively speaking. Their health care system seems to be sliding down the NHS path.

    That aside. Consider Oscar Arias. He wanted to stand for President again. The constitution prohibited him to do so. The Courts did not allow him to do so. So his friends replaced enough Court members, he went back for a second attempt and this time got the Constitution changed by judicial fiat. So he was elected again.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C3%93scar_Arias

    Arias announced in 2004 that he intended to run again for president in the February 2006 general elections. By then, he was the only living former president who was not either in jail, under indictment or facing an investigation.

    The only living former president not in jail, under indictment or facing an investigation?

    This is not exactly Swiss rectitude is it? How many Swiss presidents have ever been investigated?

  15. Bloke in Costa Rica

    Chile seems to be doing just fine. So is Uruguay. Their President may be a bit of a loon, but a very harmless loon.

    I think the fact that a President can be investigated, indicted or jailed is rather the exception, even among mature democracies. They know now that they can’t get away with it, so for the most part they don’t try. The one term Presidency thing was idiotic, everyone knew it was idiotic, and the way it was changed was about as normal as one could hope for. The limit was challenged, it was upheld, a second challenge was launched and this time Sala IV struck the limit down. That’s hardly tanks on the lawn stuff. Remember, I was here at the time. Oscar Arias (whose exceptionally modest house is round the corner from mine) was by no stretch of the imagination a crook.

    As for healthcare: I would far, far rather be treated under the Costa Rican system than throw myself on the tender mercies of the NHS. When I had a retinal bleed I was into a world class opthalmologist’s clinic for laser cautery within 90 minutes of seeing my GP. I basically owe my sight to the speed with which I was treated. I was out of pocket about $120 for this. An op to arrest the retinopathy was outpatient, in the same surgery (which would not look out of place in Geneva) and cost me $340. I chose when to have the op.

  16. “This is not exactly Swiss rectitude is it? How many Swiss presidents have ever been investigated?”

    how many Swiss presidents can you name without googling?

    And none of them were elected. It’s done on a 12-month stint basis, and they’re just the nominal head of state for the purpose of external relations, with no power emanating therefrom (they’ve often got their portfolio as Bundesrat as well, so Ueli Maurer was Bundespresident and Defence Minister at the same time when it was his turn).

    It’s a good system, and should be emulated widely 🙂

  17. bloke (not) in spain

    4.2% p/a GDP growth (after 6.2% in 2011)
    Budget surplus 0.4% GDP
    Public debt 39.6% GDP
    Inflation 2.2%
    BoT surplus $5.2b

    The city was graded by a tourist guide as twice as safe as London to be out in, after dark.

    The country’s Colombia & the city’s Medallin.

    And you can smoke in bars.

    That clinched it for me. F**k UK. F**k Europe. Bye.

  18. It used to be so that, every year newspapers report the first cuckoo of Spring. An inevitable event, but “when” is the interesting part.

    In this experiment we must seek the inevitable claim: “ah but that’s not true socialism”

    I claim the prize, for right there in the comments thread, someone is saying They’re not socialists; they’re lowest common denominator thugs, populists and fascists. In short: they’re scum.

  19. Bloke in Costa Rica

    b(n)is: Medellín has earned the sobriquet “The City of Eternal Spring”. Bloke I know moved there and he likes it. Your best bet for a good climate is in the tropics, but 1000-1500m above sea level (like where I live).

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