Interesting

London: British researchers have debunked a long-prevailing theory that ocean acidification from the asteroid impact that killed the dinosaurs caused the extinction of marine molluscs.

The team from University of Southampton found that the acidification levels produced were too weak to have caused the disappearance of the calcifying organisms 66 million years ago when the asteroid hit the Earth.

The next question though is the really interesting one. Will predicted acidification from human emissions lead to a similar exitnction or not? For the predictions that it will depend to some extent upon the assumption that it did. And if it didn’t then what of the prediction?

7 thoughts on “Interesting”

  1. So Much for Subtlety

    Whatever the Warmists say is likely to be wrong. Wait to see their response. Assume the opposite.

    I do not believe that we have the slightest chance in hell of making the oceans significantly less basic. Or if we do, that it will have any significant impact. After all, the Great Barrier Reef has been there for some time. It is some 24 million years old. So it missed the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum. But it got the Middle Miocene Extinction event.

    And yet it is still there.

  2. The sea is alkaline. Within the tidal zone there is a huge diurnal variation in pH without ever reaching pH 7 ie neutral: this is the area where shellfish with calcium carbonate coverings thrive. Ignore the hysteria, it is most strongly associated with grantseeking behaviour.

  3. There is no prospect of acidification. All that’s been predicted is a small degree of de-alkalinisation. But a warmer ocean would absorb less CO2 (at any given partial pressure of CO2 in the atmosphere), opening the possibility of greater acidification. Ooh, matron!

  4. It can only be yet another computer model.

    Still, it can’t be less sophisticated than the sub-Airfix one they use at UAE.

  5. Bloke in Costa Rica

    The Chicxulub impactor had a kinetic energy on entering the atmosphere of roughly 5×10^23 J, or about 120 petatons of TNT equivalent. It caused magnitude 12 earthquakes at the antipodal point from the impact. It set the atmosphere on fire round the globe and caused a blazing wall of plasma to incinerate everything to a radius where Savannah, Georgia is today. If that can’t acidify the oceans (via nitric oxide → nitrogen dioxide → nitric and nitrous acid in water) then the pipsqueak emissions humans have caused don’t even get a look-in.

  6. “But a warmer ocean would absorb less CO2 (at any given partial pressure of CO2 in the atmosphere), opening the possibility of greater acidification. Ooh, matron!”

    Surely reducing / eliminating the possibiilty?

    You’d think it was a self-regulating system dominated by a negative feedback. Who’d have thunk it?

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