As a reward for his services to Czech football, two years later he was allowed to move abroad.

So, local boy for the Czechs I work with:

Josef Masopust was born near Most, in north-western Czechoslovakia, on February 9 1931. The fourth of six brothers, he grew up in what was then an important coal-mining region; indeed its resources made it one of the first places to be annexed by Germany when they seized control of the country during Masopust’s early boyhood.
Soon after the end of the Second World War, Masopust made his debut for Banik Mostar, a local side, before moving on to Teplice, a club in the First Division. Then in 1951 he was poached by the most prestigious – and powerful – club in Czech football, Dukla Prague, the team of the Army. Masopust would remain with them for 17 years, playing 386 matches and scoring 79 goals.

OK, and world cup success etc. Then this:

As a reward for his services to Czech football, two years later he was allowed to move abroad.

It’s a reward to be allowed to leave the country.

Socialism really is wank, isn’t it?

4 thoughts on “As a reward for his services to Czech football, two years later he was allowed to move abroad.”

  1. Could well be. Although the Commies moved the whole town a few miles (no, really!) so as to open up a coal bed. So that bridge, if still extant, is a little lonely now.

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